1

I want to move to a different country because of my country's poor economic situation. The unemployment rate is high, and salaries are pretty low. I have a good education, and believe that I could make it abroad.

How do I explain this on a cover letter? I don't want to come across as desperate, or negative.

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    What are you from? Are thinking of moving from a poor EU country to a rich one, for example? Or are you in a situation where obtaining a work visa is a bit more difficult, such as moving from the middle east to the US? – AndreiROM Jan 7 '16 at 19:09
  • You can always say that you were looking for a better opportunity. – PM 77-1 Jan 8 '16 at 3:33
  • I am thinking moving from poor part of EU (ex Yugoslavia) to rich one - Denmark! – Nikolina Jan 11 '16 at 7:59
13

You don't need to explain. In fact, a potential employer wouldn't really care about your reasons, only about your credentials and skills. If you can show that you can be of value for them, and if there is a reasonably easy way for you to immigrate then your chances are good, otherwise you would have to prove some really unique capabilities to get someone to hire you.

Your cover letter should be much more about them and how you can help them succeed.

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    Also, unless the company (and hiring manager) lives under a rock, they most likely know the general economic situation if they are in the same general region. Otherwise they could look it up on the internet if they really cared. – RubberChickenLeader Jan 7 '16 at 19:07
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    +1: Ease of immigration is huge, nobody wants to go through piles of beauorcracy for a hire unless they are very special. – Myles Jan 7 '16 at 19:44
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    +1 an employer wouldn't care. Employers are well aware of why people move for better opportunities, you don't need to explain that. – Kilisi Jan 8 '16 at 8:42
  • "In fact, a potential employer wouldn't really care about your reasons": that is not always true. I do care quite a bit about someones motivation: it's a key factor in determining whether this is a good long term fit. "The money is good" alone doesn't cut it. Neither does "you are the only ones willing to sponsor a visa". – Hilmar Jan 8 '16 at 13:26
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There's nothing shocking or even unusual about what you describe. You don't say what country you're from or where you're thinking of going. But here in the U.S., people routinely move from one part of the country to another to take advantage of more and better jobs at the destination. Places with more jobs routinely send representatives to places with fewer jobs to recruit employees.

I wouldn't even bring it up in a resume or job application. If someone asks, say "I'm looking for better opportunities." If they push for more detail, just tell the truth: In my home country, unemployment is high and its hard to find a good job even if you're a well-qualified person.

I'd be surprised if someone asked for details, except maybe out of curiosity. I'd be VERY surprised if someone thought this was a bad reason. Frankly, if someone pushed for details, I'd suspect that they wanted to make sure that this was the real reason, and not that you couldn't find a job because you're lazy and irresponsible, or you have to get out of the country before the police catch you, or some such.

  • Well, I don't think this is quite accurate. The OP asks about moving to another country, but you talk about moving within a country. While I agree that I wouldn't bring it up in a cover letter, I would be very surprised if it was n't asked about in an interview. – dirkk Jan 7 '16 at 21:38
  • @dirkk Sure, I meant moving within a country as something similar where I had direct knowledge, of course it's not the same. And I didn't say no one would ask why, but that I doubted they would have a problem with an answer like "looking for better opportunities" and push for more details or explanation. – Jay Jan 8 '16 at 14:27

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