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This is related to How to handle numerous temporary positions in a resume or application form. I'm not worried how it looks to have many short-term contracting jobs; that's the nature of technical writing.

But sometimes recruiters who've seen my resume will call and ask me if I'd be "open" to a permanent (or long-term contract) job. I tell them the truth: I would much prefer it.

I wonder how many recruiters see my resume, assume that I prefer contracting, and call someone else.

Is there something I can say in my resume that explains that I'd prefer long-term jobs? Or, at least, that I'm open to both? What's the best way to word it?

EDIT: When I send my resume, I can indeed state my preference in my cover letter. But my question wasn't clear: what about recruiters who see my resume on a job site, and decide whether or not to call me? There's usually no cover letter involved; they do a search for skills or experience, my resume comes up, and they scan it very quickly. In those first few seconds I have to convince them that the rest of my resume is not what I want to do going forward.

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    Seeking long-term position. – keshlam Jan 24 '16 at 0:14
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    Your resume doesn't - your cover letter would. – HorusKol Jan 24 '16 at 0:38
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    @HorusKol That's true, but a lot of recruiters get my resumes from the job boards where there's no cover letter posted. – Shawn V. Wilson Jan 24 '16 at 0:44
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    Ok, "prefer" rather than "seeking". Just say what you mean, as long as it's clear. – keshlam Jan 24 '16 at 0:47
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    @JoeStrazzere Agreed, job boards are probably the only place where I'd recommend use of an Objective statement because you typical don't have a cover letter there. @ OP: consider rewording this question because as-written the answer is "It can't / shouldn't." – Lilienthal Jan 25 '16 at 9:59
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This should be addressed in your covering letter. Perhaps explain that although you previously have worked as a contractor or part-time, that you are presently seeking a full time/long term position.

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Many job sites have a space for free form text - I'd put it there.

In Linked In, I'd put it in the Summary.

As job sites can vary, you may want to dig around at other candidates & opportunities and see if it's a good plan to mark any checkboxes as yes/no - I'd generally say, go for the widest set of fixed criteria (checkboxes, selected options, etc) that you are actually willing to consider when you are actively hunting. And then go with a more selective set of criteria more approximating a position preferred to you own when you currently have a job that is acceptable.

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