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I recently reneged on an offer of Company A as the new offer from Company B I got was a dream offer as it aligned very well with my skills and career goals.

The HR person from A wants to contact B to advise them on the business stating something like this " to give the business background on your decision to keep a positive relationship with them". The HR wants to talk to me on the phone regarding this too.

I don't exactly know what this means and if I should let A know the name of B. What can I expect in the call?

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    Tell him np you will send him an email... and then never send that email and never contact them again. nothing good will come of that conversation. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Feb 3 '16 at 22:11
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    @JoeStrazzere - Because Saying no invites the HR person to immediately take action. If you say ill email you chances are that HR Person is going to forget that he was about to throw a monkey wrench in your new position. In many places the recruiter that you refer to as the HR person gets a bonus based on hiring you. By reneging you cost them money so they may want to mess with you. Tell them you will send them an email withthe contact info and then delete the contact from your email – IDrinkandIKnowThings Feb 3 '16 at 23:23
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    I'd just say no, I can see where Chad is coming from, but I wouldn't go to the bother. No way I would let them dictate anything to me. – Kilisi Feb 3 '16 at 23:27
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    @Chad This discussion is why we don't answer in the comments. :) – Lilienthal Feb 3 '16 at 23:33
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Short answer: It's HR-speak for "we want to find out why you didn't take the job with us." But this doesn't make sense.

It sounds like someone in HR has been tasked with doing some research as to why you, a favourable candidate, reneged on a given offer. Ostensibly, they want to try to make sure it doesn't happen again.

Realistically, there is no way I would let a company I rejected contact my current employer. There is absolutely no valid reason why they should contact them. They can ask you at the very most, but to go beyond that is troubling.

If you decide to contact them, use caution. Just simply tell them the job was a better fit with your long term goals. Do not pass on contact details for your new employer. If they press, simply repeat the above statement and give no further information.

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    Thank you, I found that sentence very fishy and was not able to think of one positive outcome by letting them contact B. Good thing I asked you guys in StackExchange! :D – Huga Feb 3 '16 at 22:20
  • Thanks @JaneS and DJClayworth! I will not talk to them and provide unnecessary information. Do you agree with the approach Chad posted in the comments? – Huga Feb 3 '16 at 22:25
  • @Huga Not quite. If I contacted them at all, it would be via email, stating what I said in my answer. If they come back asking for more information, then I wouldn't respond. You answered their question, there is no reason for engaging in extended dialogue. – Jane S Feb 3 '16 at 22:26
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    I would be concerned that another possible motivation beyond finding out why is attempting to queer the deal between you and B. It doesn't make business sense but people are people and sometimes behave irresponsibly. – Myles Feb 3 '16 at 22:32
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    @Lilienthal Umm, doesn't my answer say what you're saying? Realistically, there is no way I would let a company I rejected contact my current employer. There is absolutely no valid reason why they should contact them. They can ask you at the very most, but to go beyond that is troubling. – Jane S Feb 3 '16 at 23:34

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