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If a 1 or 2 year gap in the chronology of a resume is the result of dealing with a pretty significant medical condition, how do you handle that in the interview process? An excellent resume, but just big time gaps.

Say nothing about the time gaps unless asked?
Proactively explain the gaps as the result of a medical issue, but then not what it is?
Go even further and say what the issue is?
Go all the way and proactively explain what the condition is and that the condition is almost certainly resolved, but still in an absolute worse case scenario X might still happen?

How would an official document from an elite medical specialist that says you are cured come into play? Is such a document relevant? When would you present it?

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    This is very similar to workplace.stackexchange.com/q/49486/17890 which was closed as a duplicate of another similar question. – shoover Feb 7 '16 at 2:38
  • @JoeStrazzere nah bro. Everyone on the planet has an x% chance of this happening. The rub of the matter is how can anyone know what their "x" is going forward into the future. I've no idea what my "x" is. That's all I care to say. – david Feb 7 '16 at 2:39
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If a 1 or 2 year gap in the chronology of a resume is the result of dealing with a pretty significant medical condition, how do you handle that in the interview process?

You should say nothing about the time gaps unless asked or it is otherwise necessary to account for that time, or unless you need to ask for special accommodations due to your condition.

Even then, only explain as much as is necessary for the interview. Often you just need to acknowledge that there is a real gap, that it isn't a typo, and that you had something you needed to deal with. You might need to convey that you weren't just sitting around without a job for no reason.

Most employers won't care at all about the details of your medical condition, but some might need to be reassured that it is something which is in the past (if that's truly the case). Again, no need to recount any painful details - just enough to answer the questions being asked.

Go all the way and proactively explain what the condition is and that the condition is almost certainly resolved, but still in an absolute worse case scenario X might still happen?

This is something only you can judge.

If there is still a reasonable possibility of a recurrence or flare-up or something else that would mean significant time off or even leaving the job, some would say that it is best to be proactive about the condition.

You need to consider the likelihood, the impact, and the severity of the condition.

How would an official document from an elite medical specialist that says you are cured come into play?

I would never resort to this unless it were a condition for employment (for example, if you couldn't be a pilot without medical clearance from your heart surgeon).

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    yeah, I like this. Just leave the gaps with no explanations. They are what they are. If they want clarification but don't ask for it, then it is their loss. – david Feb 7 '16 at 21:09
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Unless you're applying for a position that requires a certain level of physical fitness then there is no need to go into detail in the first instance. In these cases it is normal to ask for medical history if any that may apply, and you'd definitely need to give a summary, pointing out your full recovery.

If it was a mental health issue then that is another story. And probably best not to mention at all.

If it's a medical condition that has left you physically impaired in some way that means you need special equipment or something, then you'd also need to mention your special needs.

The only time I would present the document you mentioned is if I was tasked to explain about the medical condition. Which in my opinion would be an unlikely scenario in most industries.

I spent almost a year recovering from a car accident, I don't even list it, if asked I just say I was recovering from a car accident.

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