I have just been told that after 4 weeks on my new job, there has been a problem of adaptation (apparently it should have been quicker) and that I would not continue working in the company.

My question is whether it is worth mentioning a job on a CV which hasn't lasted more than the trial period.

I think it is good that I passed the selection process and was given the opportunity to work there but on the other hand it may look funny on the CV and the interviewer may ask awkward questions.

marked as duplicate by Jim G., Lilienthal, Adam V, Joe Strazzere, The Wandering Dev Manager Feb 15 '16 at 19:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    I think (in my personal opinion) that anything less than 3 months can't be considered real/actual/substantial experience so I wouldn't put it in my CV but that's just my opinion – Just Do It Feb 15 '16 at 16:54
  • 1
    @OP adding on to my answer on the question I linked: any positive effect of getting the job is completely outweighed by the enormous negative effect that leaving a job after only 4 weeks will have. – Lilienthal Feb 15 '16 at 17:05
  • And I completely disagree with Lilienthal. If you have to leave, then leave. While it's certainly bad to build up a reputation for leaving jobs after such a short amount of time, sometimes it can be necessary to leave one immediately because it's not what was advertised. – Jim G. Feb 15 '16 at 17:18
  • 1
    @JimG. Your comment says "Sometimes it can be necessary to leave one immediately because it's not what was advertised". That is what you're basing your comment on, yet that didn't happen in this situation. OP was asked to leave because he/she didn't work out for the position, this wasn't a situation where the OP didn't like the job and ended up leaving early. HUGE difference. Basically in a way the OP was "fired", not passing the trial period and being let go. Not making the conscious decision to leave because the job wasn't what they thought. – New-To-IT Feb 15 '16 at 17:41
  • 1
    Like I said, I agree that sometimes you have to leave a job because it's not what you thought, and sometimes leaving that job early is necessary. But that's not what happened here if I understand the OP correctly. They were let go, so it's a different set of circumstances. – New-To-IT Feb 15 '16 at 17:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Short answer: No, don't put this on your resume.

Long answer: Just because you were let go during the trial period, due to slower than normal adaptation to the job, doesn't necessarily mean you're bad at what you do. Maybe you just take longer to grasp all the ideals that the company has for their employees. This can lead to you being let go, as you are not "perfect" in their eyes.

Now, knowing that yourself, doesn't mean everyone will see it that way when you walk into an interview. Even if you explain what happened, they might just assume you're putting yourself in a positive light instead of telling them what really happened. I would say leave the job off your resume and just go from there. Build your resume up on your strengths and past employment that you performed well in. The people who read your resume will only see that you lasted in your previous job for a month, and they'll wonder why, possibly might kill your chances of getting an interview.

Again, don't get down on yourself. Each company has different expectations of their employees, some expect you to be a pro within a week, some expect it's going to take longer to get settled in and they understand things can take time, especially for a new employee. Just keep working hard and keep your resume focused on the good.

  • Hi, out of curiosity, what would you advise if if this is OP's first job ever? If he does not include it in his résumé, his employment history would be blank... – MY_G Feb 16 '16 at 9:10
  • 1
    @JoeStrazzere that's a good point, didn't really think about that side of it. – New-To-IT Feb 16 '16 at 13:36
  • @MY_G, assuming this was OP's first job ever, their employment history was blank and they were still considered for this job, guessing their skills and such are good enough to land them another job. – New-To-IT Feb 16 '16 at 13:36

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.