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I maintain servers and develop applications for my employeer.

I am paid the market rate in the area where I live and there are only a few companies which would pay me more for my skillset.

Nevertheless my colleague is making more money than me because he has been in the same position before me. He doesnt have the same skillset/background or is able to follow my work.

Colleagues from other departments always ask me first if they have questions because they know that I have developed it all by myself.

What do you think I should do? Wait for my line manager to realize that I should be paid more or simply quit? I dont want to bring up a comparisons in our next performance review and I think it is obvious who does the work.

closed as off-topic by paparazzo, Jim G., Masked Man, gnat, Philip Kendall Feb 18 '16 at 8:58

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – paparazzo, Jim G., Masked Man, gnat, Philip Kendall
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Asking for advice on what to do is off-topic here. Can you rephrase your question? – Jane S Feb 17 '16 at 22:25
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    Overpaying your colleague has nothing to do with what is fair market salary for you. In a way think of it as precedence for you to get over paid some day. Really you think you should quit because your colleague is paid too much? Do you get how ridiculous that sounds? – paparazzo Feb 17 '16 at 22:26
  • almost every job I've had I ended up making more money than people who had been there longer. The concerning part is the OP knows how much his colleague makes in the first place. I'd ask for more money. – Kilisi Feb 18 '16 at 7:14
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I am paid the market rate in the area where I live and there are only a few companies which would pay me more for my skillset.

This seems like the limiting factor in any potential negotiations.

Nevertheless my colleague is making more money than me because he has been in the same position before me.

And that's probably what your boss will say if you bring up your coworker (which I advise against). Whether deep down inside they agree with you, this would be a great item for them to bring up to deflect you.

It sounds like you need to put your time in and continue to get raises/experience. If you're able to shortcut that and get a big raise that is comparable to your coworkers then great, but I don't think you're in a position to do so with the information you've provided.

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Wait for my line manager to realize that I should be paid more or simply quit?

Why are these the only two options? You can ask for a raise without threatening to quit. Simply have a conversation with your manager explaining that you believe your responsibilities and accomplishments warrant an increase in pay. Do NOT bring up comparisons to the other employee. Focus on what you do on a daily basis and talk about your concrete accomplishments.

There could be some blowback from the manager. They may feel that you are unhappy in your position or that you in fact do not deserve a raise. If they are unwilling to give you a raise, then naturally they may fear that you will begin searching for a new job... and the manager will start to think about replacing you.

The more likely scenario is that your manager will agree that you do an excellent job and will either agree to give you a raise or compensate you in other ways (more vacation time, perks in the office, etc.).

The most important thing to remember is not to approach this like you are complaining, unhappy, or jealous of your co-worker. Focus on what you do well and try to get your manager to see it your way. This is not a hostile argument, it's a sales pitch. Keep it short, keep it focused, and most importantly do not lose your temper if the manager counters your points with criticism. Good luck.

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