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So, I just graduated and for personal reasons I'll take some time off(possible LASIK surgery soon), and meanwhile I'm taking a couple online courses in my field (Computer Engineering), is it correct to add them to my curriculum after I finish these same courses?

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  • "is it correct to add them to my curriculum" - do you mean to add it to your CV? If so, yes, see: workplace.stackexchange.com/questions/42653/…
    – Brandin
    Mar 1 '16 at 14:10
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    Just a sidenote, not sure how much time you plan on taking off, but I wouldn't attribute a month or more hiatus to a LASIK procedure, especially when doctors release patients to go back to work the next day or day after. I'm all for taking some time after college for yourself, just don't make it look like you'll be going home for every paper cut, just be honest when asked...
    – Ron Beyer
    Mar 1 '16 at 14:19
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You can list courses and certifications as long as they're relevant.

Certifications:

Certifications never really hurt to add to the list. You just have to make sure they're in "the right spot". If they're very relevant to the job, add them somewhere where they'll be seen right off the bat. If not, maybe mention them in a separate section.

For example, if you're applying for a job in which your certification is relevant:

Degrees and Certifications
Bachelor of Computer Science, University of Earth (2012 - 2016)
- Completed degree in ... ; GPA 3.8; Honor Student
Microsoft XYZ Certification, Microsoft Certification Program (February 2016)
- Wrote the Microsoft XYZ certification exam and passed with a score of 92%

However, if you're applying for a job developing apps for Apple's app store:

Education
Bachelor of Computer Science, University of Earth (2012 - 2016)
- Completed degree in ... ; GPA 3.8; Honor Student
...
...Relevant Experience
...
Certifications
Microsoft XYZ Certification, Microsoft Certification Program (February 2016)
- Wrote the Microsoft XYZ certification exam and passed with a score of 92%

Courses:

Stand alone courses can help you grasp a concept, but are rarely enough in and of themselves to land you a job.

For example, if I were applying for an Objective-C development role, but had worked primarily with C# and Windows environments, I would mention that I took courses in Objective-C development, and participated in relevant personal, or open source projects on my resume.

What you need to do is determine how important those courses are for the job at hand:

Education
Bachelor of Computer Science, University of Earth (2012 - 2016)
- Completed degree in ... ; GPA 3.8; Honor Student
...
...Relevant Experience
Objective C Programming Course, College of Luna (Sep 2015 - Dec 2015)
- things about the course (and why it is relevant to the position) go here
Your Current Position, Windows Dev Company (Sep 2015 - Dec 2015)
- things about the course (and why it is relevant to the position) go here
...
Certifications
Microsoft XYZ Certification, Microsoft Certification Program (February 2016)
- Wrote the Microsoft XYZ certification exam and passed with a score of 92%

However, if the course is not really relevant what you might want to do is simply mention it in the interview, but not put it on the resume. Companies will generally like that you take the time to learn new things, even if they're not directly related to the matter at hand.

For example, if you're signed up to a site for learning new things, or have a high reputation on Stack Overflow you might mention that to prove that you're dedicated to your profession, but you might not put that in your CV.

Hope that helps.

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  • What putting something like viewed (10000 hours of pluralsight videos relevant to software development) ? Jul 13 '18 at 7:59
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If you're talking about your CV, you can put down anything that may be relevant or set you apart from other candidates, so yes of course.

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