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I applied to a job via craigslist post. Person contacted me and asked a few qualification questions. My email disclosed my website, and resume and Linkedin.

They then proceeded to ask me for job references. I said I would like to learn more about the company and their website and location and they refused to provide any info by stating they can't provide any info until I give them references. To add to the matter, their email is company_name@gmail.com, the email did not contain persons name or signature or anything. Is that a normal practice or should I be wary in my proceedings?

  • 137
    Run! Run like the wind! – Marv Mills Mar 16 '16 at 16:35
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    That just screams "SCAM!" to me – DLS3141 Mar 16 '16 at 16:39
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    This is a bottom-feeder recruiter, at best. An identity thief, at worst. – Wesley Long Mar 16 '16 at 16:39
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    Yup. I can't think of any possible scenario that reasonably explains this other than this "job" being a front for somebody who wants to get your references. Probably some unscrupulous recruiter. Or worse. Do not give them anything. – Francine DeGrood Taylor Mar 16 '16 at 16:40
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    yeah upon further investigation i found out that it is a front of some sort as they have spammed many job websites with various emails as a carpet cleaning business which was ok with paying a substantial salary to a web designer hahaha thank you all for the info – Stanley VM Mar 16 '16 at 17:07
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Don't do it! This is a recruiter looking to get you to provide managerial references. You'll never hear from that person again, and they'll be plugging your references for new business.

Old scam.

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    I think you're being optimistic in thinking this is even a recruiter. – Laconic Droid Mar 16 '16 at 16:42
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    Information on a resume is pretty generic and useless to a marketer without some demographics. But phone numbers to hiring managers are GOLDEN! :) – Xavier J Mar 16 '16 at 16:44
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    Right, but phone numbers and job references are valuable to someone trying to open a store credit card in your name and buy a large screen TV. – Laconic Droid Mar 16 '16 at 16:51
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    A colleague responded: "Sure! Here is my current manager's phone number." Then gave them the phone number to the local Sheriff's Department. :) – MealyPotatoes Mar 16 '16 at 21:29
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    @codenoire I did some consulting work for the fraud department of a major credit card company. SSN is trivially easy to obtain if you have other details such as phone numbers and employment history. – Laconic Droid Mar 17 '16 at 17:28
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Yes it is normal practice for meeting a creep. At worst they might ask for pictures and if you like leather or being tied up.

At best they are a fishy company with little funding and pay. In the middle they might just be skimming for contacts.

Verdict: Don't. Ignore future contact unless you just feel like messing with them with fake info.

(you can give them a series of email address and fake people to see what things these people get in the future)

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    I like the idea of providing fake contact information and faking being your own references to see what happens to them. – Bobson Mar 16 '16 at 19:32
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    Or, create a few e-mail accounts for the 'references' and see what comes in. – CramerTV Mar 17 '16 at 19:45

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