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I have been working at my company for three years, and in that time they have been great to me. I have received two promotions, one of which really helped me figure out what I want to do with myself and how I want to develop my career. I was starting to feel like I did all the growing I was going to do at this company recently, so I started looking for other jobs. I found one that I think would be great! I set up my resume and cover letter and spent the night and next day thinking it over.

Then my boss pulled me into a room and promoted me. I was in complete SHOCK and excitedly and not really thinking, accepted. I have now been in the position for a month and the luster has worn off. I do not think this new promotion is a good fit for me. I truly loved what I used to be doing.

So.. my dilemma is, I would like to leave my job, but have only been in this promotion for a month.

Is there a way to handle this so that my boss will not despise me entirely and that I won't have to cut the ties? Is this extremely unprofessional? What do I say to my new potential employers in interviews if they ask why I am leaving so quickly after a promotion? Should I bite the bullet and wait it out a few more months?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Chris E, jimm101, Michael Grubey, Dawny33 Mar 29 '16 at 2:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I'm not so sure this is a duplicate - the other question includes the payment of a bonus, while this one doesn't - a VERY important difference. – Careerasaurus.com Apr 12 '16 at 13:40
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Is there a way to handle this so that my boss will not despise me entirely and that I won't have to cut the ties?

If your boss is a person worth not cutting ties with, a simple "Thanks for all the help and opportunities, but I'm off to new adventures" is enough.

Is this extremely unprofessional?

It's business. You're leaving because you found something better. It they found someone better than you, they would fire you on the spot.

What do I say to my new potential employers in interviews if they ask why I am leaving so quickly after a promotion?

Why would they know you've been promoted? In the off chance that they call your current employer and he tells them, just say the obvious: you thought it would be a good thing, but it didn't meet all your expectations.

Should I bite the bullet and wait it out a few more months?

What do you expect from this? What do you think would change? What random amount of time do you think would make your quitting less unprofessional?

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Q: Is there a way to handle this so that my boss will not despise me entirely and that I won't have to cut the ties?

A: Yes, be perfectly honest (your explanation above makes sense) and offer to stay in the role longer than the minimum, doing the very best job you can, and help find and train your replacement.

Q: Is this extremely unprofessional?

A: It's not ideal, but you took the new role in good faith and it's not working out. If you weren't working out for the company, they'd be within their rights to make a change. It doesn't sound like the company invested tens of thousands of dollars in a bonus or in training, so finish-up very well, then after a month or two send personal thank you notes to everyone who deserves them.

Q: What do I say to my new potential employers in interviews if they ask why I am leaving so quickly after a promotion?

A: What you've said makes sense. Emphasize that you took the promotion in hopes that it would address your concerns, explain how it failed, what you learned, and then why the job and company you're interviewing with is a better fit. Practice wording this so it's succinct, but clear.

Q: Should I bite the bullet and wait it out a few more months?

A: Continue doing a great job in your current role, help them replace you when you go (start grooming 1 or more people on your team who might be great replacements - teach, then delegate) and be very selective about where else you interview, but waiting 3 months won't change the ultimate outcome.

Good luck.

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Is there a way to handle this so that my boss will not despise me entirely and that I won't have to cut the ties? Is this extremely unprofessional? What do I say to my new potential employers in interviews if they ask why I am leaving so quickly after a promotion? Should I bite the bullet and wait it out a few more months?

Quitting is purely up to you, so long as you hand in the required notice and soldier on doing solid work until the end, there is no need for anyone to be upset.

There is no need to be mentioning that you left after a promotion in an interview, only what your position was. I can't see anything positive coming from stressing that you only held that position for a couple of months.

Whether you wait a bit longer or not is really up to you, if you have pressing reasons for quitting, then quit, if it's just the job that is your reason for leaving, then make up your mind. You could always ask for a demotion, or a compromise at work. I refused a couple of promotions because I didn't relish the job and/or wanted to stay in a 'hands on' role.

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