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Someone I know , used to work for a company in a senior capacity.

The experience was very unpleasant, although I don't know all the details. He basically scratched the mention that he worked there from any social networks and probably from his CV.

From what I read here and there especially on this site, it is not advised. But let's say things have taken a nasty turn , mostly because you don't get along with your manager (super diva attitude from the manager and company has also a very bad rep and because I know my acquaintance work attitude is Neat, having worked with him for some time), making you feel so scornful/resentful that you'd rather say you were panhandling food on the street than mentioning them again, would you resort to that method (in the US and abroad)?

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    It would depend the industry and location, and the reason things went sour. If you got dismissed for stealing vrs quit because your manager was an unpleasant person. – Kilisi Apr 8 '16 at 9:32
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    I feel like this has been asked before but can't find a suitable question that matches exactly. This one is close. – Lilienthal Apr 8 '16 at 10:09
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    A CV and social media are two different things. If you remove it from a CV, you'll probably have to explain to a potential employer why you have an employment gap. – Brandin Apr 8 '16 at 11:04
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    If the workplace has a bad reputation then people will tend to side with your friend .In this case it does not matter .If your friend has too many nasty experiences then he may get "Leprosey " – Autistic Apr 8 '16 at 11:12
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    @Autistic. is correct. Businesses get reputations as well. I consulted at one company where they paid 1.5x the industry standard just to get people in the door because that company's reputation was well known and nobody would work for them for less. Keep that in mind as well. Sometimes a bad experience with a bad company is a plus – Old_Lamplighter Apr 8 '16 at 12:20
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But let's say things have taken a nasty turn , making you feel so scornful/resentful that you'd rather say you were panhandling food on the street than mentioning them again, would you resort to that method (in the US and abroad)?

Its always a value judgement. The value of the experience and not having a gap in your resume versus the value of not having that company on your resume and in your references.

There are certain industries and reasons why that might be desireable, for instance if you got fired for cause for stealing or making free with company secrets.

Generally speaking having a gap in your resume or declining to comment what you did in that time can hurt your chances, but it will hurt them alot less then to admit you were fired for cause for stealing or in a very public position of a company that spectacularly failed.

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  • Hi @Magisch, I've edited my question a bit. Thanks for your answer – Andy K Apr 8 '16 at 9:36
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As a freelancer I list all experiences - including the ones that ended badly.

I had considered not listing one of them because it was very short - but still listed it to avoid the awkwardness of a potential client inquiring about the short gap in employment, even though this is OK for a freelancer. In that situation, I would either need to come clean and admit the bad experience or downright lie and say I was between contracts. Being honest just seems a better option than both of those.

The only scenario where I possibly would leave out an experience is if it was short (a couple of months max), ended badly AND was at a client so 'interesting' that future clients will inquire (e.g. Google).

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