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I'm in a bit of a panic right now, so I'd love some advice. I'm sorry in advance for the long post. I applied for two different positions at the same company (a large hospital), let's call them job A and job B. I'm looking for a job for just the next year, since I will be going back to school in fall of 2017. Job A interviewed me first, but didn't get back to me for a while, so I started looking for other positions. I then got a quick interview for job B with the same company (very similar title, but in a totally different department/ building). Job B went through the reference checks quickly and just offered me the position today. They want an answer by Tuesday at the latest (giving me about 1.5 business days to think it over).

Meanwhile, Job A emailed me today and told me that they're 'moving forward with my application', and that I'm the final candidate. However, they have not yet done any reference checks, no discussion of salary, etc.

Here are the pros and cons of each job:

Job A Pros: Job A is a department that I'm more interested in. They are aware that I would be leaving after a year and are totally OK with it. The department head for whom I would be working seems like a great person, and I got a generally good vibe from the place.

Job A Cons: Things are still kind of undecided, and they haven't even begun the HR hiring processes yet (background check, reference check, etc.). I have no idea what the salary would be. They need me to start about 2 weeks earlier than I would prefer (I have some urgent family obligations that I was hoping to take care of before starting).

Job B Pros: Great salary offer, more than I expected to be honest. They also seemed like a great department, I liked the colleagues a lot - although the department head seemed a lot busier and less involved. They would allow me to start at a more optimal time, allowing me to take care of my family obligations.

Job B Cons: They are not quite aware that I would definitely be leaving after 1 year. I told them that it is a possibility when I interviewed, and they said that would be OK - but were definitely not thrilled at the prospect. Now that I have decided to go back to school in the fall of 2017 and will certainly be leaving the job after a year, I'm worried that they would be unhappy.

There is an added complication because both jobs are at the same company - so I'm a bit worried that the same HR person might be dealing with my file for both positions! So while she's waiting on my answer for Job B, she's supposed to be doing my reference checks for Job A?? Seems a bit awkward to me, is this bad form?

I also notified Job A as soon as I got the offer from B, telling them that I'd much rather come work for A, and whether there is any way to expedite the HR hiring process - so that I can get an actual offer!

TL;DR: I like Job A more (primarily because they're fully on board with me only staying there for a year), but my application there still somewhat undecided. Meanwhile I have a concrete offer from Job B (and I can't really stall because they need an answer in 2 business days). What to do?

closed as off-topic by AndreiROM, gnat, Dawny33, Jim G., Lilienthal May 9 '16 at 8:58

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – AndreiROM, gnat, Dawny33, Jim G., Lilienthal
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • "What to do?" Make up your own mind. There are questions here about how to handle concurrent job searches that you should read through. – Lilienthal May 9 '16 at 8:58
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I'm not sure what you expect us to say, or what you're so worried about.

Wait until the due date to answer Job B, and if you haven't heard back from A then simply accept.

Never again mention anything about going to school to them. When you actually have to go, simply hand in your resignation letter and move on - it's your life, and your business, not theirs.

Most likely the people involved with Job A will never, ever learn that you're working in a different building of the same hospital where hundreds, if not thousands of people are employed.

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