1

We know things like ADO.NET and Winforms are part of .NET.

Now, how do you classify these technologies when it comes to CV :

1) e.g. do you just write knowledge of .NET and let them figure out what you know?

or

2) list these particularly e.g. Winforms, ADO.NET, .NET? But problem here is you are repeating yourself. The latter item .NET contains the first two. So how do you go about this?

Maybe? Winforms, ADO.NET, .NET BCL?

5
  • 1
    Do they specify those technologies on their job description? Then make sure to mention them. If they only ask for .NET then you can probably leave it at that.
    – AndreiROM
    May 9 '16 at 15:59
  • Good point. I also think like that
    – user50296
    May 9 '16 at 16:03
  • 1
    Keep in mind codenoir's advice though. He makes a very good point. Recruiters and HR are typically very ignorant. They mostly play buzzword bingo with our resumes.
    – AndreiROM
    May 9 '16 at 16:04
  • @AndreiROM Yeah I see just this makes sense that if in job requirement only .NET is stated - you can include only .NET, otherwise list them
    – user50296
    May 9 '16 at 16:14
  • They may be "part of .NET" but you could have years of experience with .NET and yet never have worked with them.
    – Casey
    May 9 '16 at 16:52
6

Try this:

".NET and related technologies such as ___, ___, ___, ___"

There are hordes of related technologies, and I'm sure a recruiter or hiring manager is probably going to be specific in his/her interest. It might seem a little tedious, but you'll do more good by including them.

The recruiters and HR people DON'T CARE about what seems repetitive. They are not developers. They scan resumes and look for keywords, and filter accordingly. Missing keywords means no interviews. That's just the way it is. Yes, it's inefficient; I've actually put "Transact-SQL" and "T-SQL" on my resume because they are clueless to the fact that they're the same thing. Don't be a snob, because it's going to keep many doors closed for you.

(I'm also a .NET developer.)

8
  • related technologies isn't really correct because stuff I listed like ADO winforms are actually part of .NET
    – user50296
    May 9 '16 at 15:54
  • 7
    You're missing the point. The recruiters DON'T CARE. They are not developers. They scan resumes and look for keywords. Missing keywords means no interviews. That's just the way it is. It's so stupid, I've actually put "Transact-SQL" and "T-SQL" on my resume because they are clueless to the fact that they're the same thing. Don't be a snob, because it's going to keep many doors closed for you.
    – Xavier J
    May 9 '16 at 15:57
  • 2
    That should be part of your answer. It is important to explain why your answer is correct. Explaining that Recruiters and HR types are just looking to check off requirements would help improve this answer greatly. May 9 '16 at 16:37
  • Good point, Chad.
    – Xavier J
    May 9 '16 at 16:43
  • But 5 page resumes also mean no interviews either... May 9 '16 at 16:49
4

It sounds like you're trying to list skills on your resume. My advice: don't.

Instead of listing skills, talk about the things that you did in each position. If you had a job where you did .NET development and used Winforms or ADO.NET, put that in the description of the job. If the company is looking for specific skills and mention them in the job posting, you can use a cover letter to introduce times when you've worked with a particular set of skills, or related skills where you can transfer your knowledge and experiences.

If you maintain a profile on something like Stack Overflow Careers or LinkedIn, you can use the appropriate sections there for keywords to help make yourself discoverable to people searching. However, even on these sites, you should write about the technologies that you use in the context of jobs you've held and projects you've worked on as well.

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  • i have listed what i did on each job too
    – user50296
    May 9 '16 at 17:51
  • @user400500 Then don't bother enumerating the technology that you know. It's one thing to have keywords on a website such as Stack Overflow Careers or LinkedIn, where people may be searching for you. Once you export to a PDF or print a paper copy, that kind of information just takes up space. Instead, focus on writing good descriptions of your roles, responsibilities, and achievements and using your cover letter to address specifics about why you are a good fit for a particular position. May 9 '16 at 17:53
  • I have listed what kind of programming tasks I did on my job roles using which tech; I will list the tech too, they won't hurt. Thanks for your feedback
    – user50296
    May 9 '16 at 17:54
  • @user400500 Like I said, it should never just be a list of the tools and technologies. It should be part of the story of the job. You should tie the tools into things that you did and things that you achieved. May 9 '16 at 17:55
  • I disagree with the advice to remove the list of skills. As noted in codenoir's answer, many people reviewing your resume want to quickly scan it to see if you meet basic job requirements. Yes, the more detailed information is helpful, but this should be in addition to the list, not a substitute for it.
    – user45590
    May 10 '16 at 11:47

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