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I'm at the last stage of hiring process. I was asked about my salary expectations up front and I said so high quote that I will not take any other factors into consideration if they accept it.

I'm not willing to change my current job for lower salary than I said. A few days before the last stage of hiring process I was asked by the company to think about

What factors will affect the decision of accepting our job offer

I feel that it will not look good if I say it straight so should I be honest or I should rather wrap it around with nice looking HR-story?

EDIT: The company did not yet answered if my salary expectations are OK for them so I expect that "What factors ..." question is a trick to negotiate my future salary.

closed as off-topic by paparazzo, Dawny33, gnat, Lilienthal, Chris E Jun 20 '16 at 13:22

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  • What is this supposed to mean "I said so high quote that I will not take any other factors into consideration if they accept it" ? Did you you really tell them "I will not take any other factors into consideration if they accept it"? – paparazzo Jun 19 '16 at 19:12
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    I don't understand your question. – Socrates Jun 19 '16 at 19:31
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    I think this means "I quoted a high enough salary that, it they agree to it, I don't care how bad the job itself is, I'll take it. If they won't meet my request, on the other hand, I don't care how good the job itself is, I'll start with my current employer." Which is unrealistic at best; benefits and opportunity for growth (and growth of salary) and working conditions should also be in the equation at the very least, even if you are in this career only for the paycheck. – keshlam Jun 19 '16 at 20:00
  • You've already told this company your minimum salary requirement? If so you don't need to mention it again. – Brandin Jun 19 '16 at 20:38
  • If asked again, don't mention "salary". Just say that you want it to be a promotion, not a demotion, for you to justify leaving your current employer, which you're perfectly happy to remain with. Basically, you've already stated your minimum, so now stay vague. Also, there are lots of things that can affect an overall package. Sign-in bonus, 401k contribution, relocation package, stock options, free lunches, medical and dental insurance, commuter checks, company car, per diem travel budget, etc. And if they can't meet you on one part of the equation, see if they compensate you on another part. – Stephan Branczyk Jun 20 '16 at 10:15
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Price may be a factor (that is not a problem), but don't insist on it as the PRIMARY factor.

Motivation, being part of the company (try to check for the particularities of the company, how you may fit with it, etc...) and other factors (proximity, other bonus from the company).

Insisting on the price as the first fastor can not be seen as the best vector of motivation at work, because you might be easily bought by another company for example, so you will become a risky asset for the company.

But, as I always say, it depends of your country. In my country (France), salary is a "taboo" so... But in US I don't know.

  • How can salary be taboo when you are applying for a job? At the end of the day they have to give a salary when they give you an offer. And of course you need a salary of at least X to pay your bills, and you probably also have some minimum salary Y in mind that you feel you're worth. – Brandin Jun 20 '16 at 9:21
  • @Brandin I suppose you are not french. In France, you don't speak much about salary, except 1 time, when the contract is coming. We don't speak about salary with colleagues, not even with friends. That's it ^^ – Gautier C Jun 20 '16 at 9:33
  • When the offer comes and it is too low, how do you cope? I want to say yes, but the salary offer is too low for me. Do you avoid saying that and just say "no thanks"? – Brandin Jun 20 '16 at 9:38
  • @Brandin in France, there is a unsaid agreement not to play with salary proposal (giving a low price, then negociating), and some salary scale. But even withthat , you say it, but it happens rarely (in my point of view, from what I know in this). – Gautier C Jun 20 '16 at 9:41
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Money was always my main motivation, I can do any job if paid enough, but it's not a great thing to tell them.

So pose your answer a bit broader and use more criteria.

Money

Working conditions

Role

It's generally understood that people will not move from their current position unless it is a forwards move for them. I'm very suspicious of anyone who wants a job for the same or less than they're getting already. It means that they're having issues with their workplace and trying to get out (possibly just ahead of being terminated), rather than they're ambitious and trying to get ahead. It doesn't mean I wouldn't hire them, but it works against them, both in the salary negotiation and in comparison with other candidates.

My normal strategy is to say that everything I have seen about the company looks positive and I feel I'd be a great fit. So if the price was right I'd be very happy to work there. (have a couple of things ready just in case they ask silly questions like "What is it about the company that you like the most?")

  • You don't think there's such a thing as "getting ahead" by getting a better job that happens to pay less? – Erik Jun 20 '16 at 10:28
  • @Erik where did I say that? A forward move is not always about money. It could be about a number of things, but usually it's about money. People don't leave jobs they're happy with for fun. – Kilisi Jun 20 '16 at 10:43
  • You said: "I'm very suspicious of anyone who wants a job for the same or less than they're getting already. It means that they're having issues with their workplace and trying to get out (possibly just ahead of being terminated), rather than they're ambitious and trying to get ahead." It might be that they are really ambitious and trying to get ahead into a job that pays less because that job has something else they want more than the extra money their current job offers. – Erik Jun 20 '16 at 11:41
  • @Erik I'm unsure what point you're trying to make. The perception of the interviewer and the reality of the interviewee can be widely different. One doesn't predicate the other. That's one of the basics of interviewing. If I'm interviewing someone who falls into that category, I don't know that, all I know is he's taking less money, he really wants/needs my job, can I negotiate him down even lower? – Kilisi Jun 20 '16 at 12:20
  • That sounds like a rather adversarial approach to interviewing. – Erik Jun 20 '16 at 12:34

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