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I'm a computer science graduate and have received 2 job offers.

Job A offers a salary of £22.5k

Job B offers a salary of £18k

I much prefer job B and would happily work for £18k

Job B have stated that I'd be working with a 6 month probation period and I feel it's reasonable to ask if my pay would rise after the probation period provided that my work has been satisfactory. I want to ask whether my pay would rise after the probation period and I'm not sure whether I should mention the other company.

Should I mention them?

Thanks!

closed as off-topic by Jim G., paparazzo, gnat, Chris E, IDrinkandIKnowThings Jun 23 '16 at 16:03

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    This is a very opinionated question. That said going from £18k to £22.5k, is a 25% bump. That is pretty significant. Are they in the same location and have similar total-compensation packages (healthcare, retirement, time off, etc)? – mikeazo Jun 23 '16 at 11:50
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    Just tell Job B that you really want to work there but you believe you are worth 22.5k. If they say no, go to Job A. – Brandin Jun 23 '16 at 11:53
  • @Brandin, If cost of living is different in the locations of A and B, or the total compensation of B is better than A, the lower salary of B might be justified. – mikeazo Jun 23 '16 at 11:58
  • B is my dream job to be honest, I'm almost certain I'm taking it. They are located 5 minutes apart and offer similar benefits outside of the salary. (both offer private healthcare, discounts for various things, etc.). I just need to know if it's worth mentioning job A's offer to B, to see if that could affect if, or how much, my salary would rise after the probationary period. – John Jun 23 '16 at 12:04
  • I think it is fair to ask if there is a pay raise after the probation. I would not mention the other company by name but maybe tell them you have another offer for substantially more. – paparazzo Jun 23 '16 at 12:22
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The risk you run is them losing interest in you by asking for a bump in salary. I'd guess 25% is a stretch, but it may not be. You could mention to them that you have received other offers and that theirs is on the low end. Ask if they are willing to increase the salary offer with a guarantee that you will accept it. You could ask for 22.5k, 20k, whatever. If they say no, tell them you would like a day to weigh all the options, then come back in the morning and accept. Tell them that after thinking about it, you believe that they are the best long-term fit for you.

I was in a similar situation a while back. I did not try to negotiate salaries (B's offer was only like 6% lower), but took B's offer. After starting there, it was clear to me that they wanted me bad enough I could have asked them to match and they gladly would have. That is not the case everywhere, however.

I'm just worried that they might think I'm lying about another offer to get a quick salary raise.

This is likely a common concern. Think about it from this prospective, however. Do you want to work for a company that assumes their employees are lying to them? Most likely they know what other companies in the area are offering for starting salaries. They also know who is hiring, how many open positions there are, and how many applicants there are. So they are likely to believe you.

I understand that I'm a graduate so it can be risky which is why I'm asking for a raise after the probationary period and not straight away.

I agree with Brandin's comment, the probationary period is for them to manage risk.

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