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I'm writing my resume. In the latest four years I worked for two companies, let's call them company A (from date X to Y) and company B (from Y until now). While I was working with company A I worked mostly for company B. When in date Y I signed for company B nothing changed, even my project manager is the same.

For now i have listed them as two job experience. I'm a little afraid that they could ask for references which I am unable to provide at the moment (both my previous boss and my current boss are the same person, and I don't want them to know that I'm searching for a new job)

Should I list them separetely or like a one job? How can i respond if a company I'm applying for asks for references?

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Since your responsibilities and role did not change, you can keep them listed as a single job:

Teapot Specialist (X - now)
Company B (formerly subcontracted by Company A)

If the two are worth splitting up, either because your starting role at A is drastically different from your current role or because your bullet points won't make sense with one entry you can go for something like this:

Teapot Specialist (Y - now)
Company B

Teapot Worker (X - Y)
Company A

Consultants will typically list their main employer (the consultancy) with any long-term projects that are worth mentioning getting get their own entry.

As for mentioning that you're working for the same manager, it's not typically necessary until you get to the reference checking stage, at which point you should explain that you can't give your manager from Company B as a reference for obvious reasons. If you want to bring it up earlier you can make a reference to it in your cover letter when describing your experience ("I followed my manager from B to A because of [reasons]") but I wouldn't recommend it. Almost all hiring managers will notify you when they need references or when they will start contacting them. If your current job is at real risk if they find out then you'll need to point this out in advance.

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