0

I was offered a position from company A. The annual salary would be $75K plus they'd give me a $1,000 signing bonus to help me relocate. I was also offered a position with company B. It would also require relocating but they offered me the same salary I'm receiving at my current job ($60K) and no relocation bonus. When I asked for a small increase in salary ($65K) I was denied and told after one year, the pay could increase to $70 or $72K depending on performance.

Should I try to renegotiate with company B and let them know I have another offer?

  • 1
    Not sure if this is a duplicate, there are so many variations on this theme but I can't recall any generic questions to dupe this to. – Lilienthal Jul 7 '16 at 7:49
6

Should I try to ask company B again for an increase

If the salary they offer won't work for you there's no harm in negotiating. You can bring up that you got a higher offer, that's not a faux pas. I typically don't advise negotiating based on other offers but the scenario you describe is one where it's not a faux pas and bizarrely it can be more effective than arguing on proper reasons. Do not mention the signing bonus. It's largely irrelevant and risks confusing your message. Some companies give them, some don't. You can ask for one during negotiation but that you'd get one at A shouldn't be a basis for comparison.

They may balk at renegotiating and simply withdraw their offer, but I'm assuming you wouldn't take it at that salary anyway. If you would accept their offer due to other reasons (benefits, location, growth, ...) then you need to be a lot more careful in your negotiation.

Don't ever believe "we may give you a raise to X in Y months". If they make that point then you need to get that promise of a raise in writing from the hiring manager. No "we'll evaluate your salary". No "conditional on good performance". It should a black-and-white "salary increase to X after 6/12 months".

Of course, if A and B are equally interesting I wouldn't even bother with this. 15k is a pretty significant gap, even if they mentioned a number close to that as a possible raise somewhere down the line.

1

Each manager should like to be aware about the market prices, regardless if they buy it or not. I would be thankful in they place, the information about salaries is valuable. As you already have that another offer, I also think there is nothing to lose.

If they would like like to have you but do not want to pay that price (or cannot afford), they will try alternative promises that must be carefully evaluated.

In case you hear "we never hire people who attempt to negotiate on anything", I would say, strange company and not a good place to work anyway.

0

You should absolutely negotiate.

You are attempting to sell something (your time and skills) that doesn't have an set price in the marketplace. Company A thinks your price should be $75k, Company B thinks it should be $60k and Company C (current) thinks it should be $60k.

You tried to convince Company B that $60k is too low of a price. They were unconvinced. It is totally valid to say "I would like to work for your organization, however, another company has offered me $75k, and the 25% raise outweighs the general positives your organization offers. Unfortunately, unless you're able to increase your offer, I am going to accept my other offer."

At that point there are 3 options.

  1. They choose to stand firm and you accept the offer from Company A.
  2. They offer to match and you accept the offer from Company B.
  3. They offer somewhere between $60k and $75k and you have to weigh your options. (You should probably decide what that number is before hand, though I wouldn't offer it up unless they counter lower - ex: "$65? If you make it $70 you have a deal").

Also, congratulations on having 3 job offers (A, B, C)!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.