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I don't have anything to "hide" but I would rather prefer to keep my hiring process focused on myself and my resume and not have it distracted by snooping in all kinds of different directions, such as social media (which is what I consider LinkedIn to effectively be). Besides, I haven't really updated my LinkedIn in several years and consider dropping off altogether.

However, a recruiter with whom I'm actively working sent a request to connect and I would prefer to not accept it. I think he's expecting me to before he continues on with the process.

My question is, should I just tell him my profile is not up to date and we should skip that process or is there something better to tell him? I'd like him to continue on without that part of due diligence. I mean, recruitment business went on much before LinkedIn ever existed so surely we can go without it again.

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    @JoeStrazzere -- i was thinking of doing that but it's kindof passive aggressive as it leaves things hanging. i prefer to bring a firm closure to all requests and inquries. it's just my style. it's reflective of my character – amphibient Jul 13 '16 at 0:38
  • Discard the invitation. Problem solved. – keshlam Jul 13 '16 at 4:16
  • I haven't really updated my LinkedIn in several years and consider dropping off altogether. Is there any chance the recruiter will say something that will change your mind about using it? – BSMP Jul 14 '16 at 1:44
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You don't need to connect with him. His paycheck depends on you getting a job, and he will not turn down the entire opportunity over a LinkedIn connection.

I don't have anything to "hide" but I would rather prefer to keep my hiring process focused on myself and my resume and not have it distracted by snooping in all kinds of different directions, such as social media (which is what I consider LinkedIn to effectively be).

How about this: dump your resume into LinkedIn so that it's merely where your resume is. Any "snooping" leads to someone seeing exactly your resume, like you want. And the whole process is strictly you and your resume.

You can complain about LinkedIn but apparently a recruiter found you using it, and you're working with him now. You can delete it if you want but you'll be "discovered" much less. (Source: I deleted mine, and all the annoying recruiter emails stopped!) It's how headhunting works now, regardless of how you would like it to work personally.

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    while I agree with the answer mostly +1... saying "His paycheck depends on you getting a job" is false. His paycheck depends on him filling the job, whether its you or someone else. – Keltari Jul 13 '16 at 2:57
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Something to consider is that a connection ISN'T alerted when you disconnect from them, they become a follower rather than a connection, so get updates but AREN'T part of your network.

You can connect and if it works out, fine. If not (especially if it's the typical recruiter with x hundred/thousand connections ), it's likely they'll never notice.

Indeed a couple I did this to came back and sent the 'please add me to your network' again, so don't worry and don't overthink it.

-1

A linkedIn is such a vital part of todays professional world that not having one might as well send them a signal that your not serious about looking right now. A killer linkedIn is a huge asset that the recruiter can use to get your foot in the door, and sell you for that role you've always wanted. How about this, go ahead and accept the invite and then talk to your recruiter about the state of your profile. Go ahead and let them know that you feel that it needs work and even ask for advice on how to make your LinkedIn page stand out. This will not only send the message that your serious about looking but also show them that your willing to take steps to improve your chances. While this might not look like much, when that recruiter is pitching you this is something they will think of and throw into the conversation.

  • Definitely agree with this. Take the time to update your Linkedin, and the recruiter's job will be a lot easier. Linkedin doesn't seem like a big deal until you do it right and put the time into keeping it up-to-date. – MK2000 Jul 12 '16 at 22:31
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    LinkedIn can be useful, but to say it is essential is wrong in many ways. Some industries don't use it at all, others only indirectly. I have not gained any of my roles through LinkedIn, and so far have not hired anyone because of LinkedIn. While I agree you should have a professional LinkedIn page, if you don't have one it will not make recruiters think that you are any less serious. – Rory Alsop Dec 18 '17 at 11:50

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