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Yesterday I attended an interview, in which one interviewer looked at me continuously and laughed till the end of the interview. I didn't do anything about that during the interview, but after I came to home I send an email saying things like you are ineligible to run a company.

Will this affect my IT career?

Note: I am a fresher and have not been employed before.

closed as off-topic by nvoigt, Chris E, gnat, scaaahu, Lilienthal Jul 24 '16 at 18:15

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    You sent an email telling them they cannot run a company and you think this will somehow help your career? – paparazzo Jul 22 '16 at 8:56
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    I expect you'll survive fine, but it was a pretty silly thing to do. How big is the IT industry where you are - are you likely to cross paths with these people again in the near future? – Rup Jul 22 '16 at 9:32
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    "looked at me continuously and laughed till the end of the interview." This would be so unprofessional that I wonder if you were misreading the situation. – David K Jul 22 '16 at 12:18
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    It's unclear exactly what you meant when you say the interviewer continuously laughed at you. That makes very little sense and from what I gather a lot of times companies bring in a senior dev and the team and it could be he's nervous about having to interview someone he never met. – Dan Jul 22 '16 at 12:44
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    You should have just left the interview. In my experience it's much more satisfying to end things on your terms and make them look like fools without actually saying anything demeaning or unprofessional. – Lilienthal Jul 22 '16 at 16:11
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You exercised exceedingly bad judgment, and yes this could come back to haunt you depending on whether the person receiving the email is insulted by it or retains it.

You never EVER know who you will end up working for. When I was laid off from one company, I left on a high note, and sent a thank-you email to everyone I had worked with.

Five years later I ended up working for them again.

Never burn bridges, never put anything insulting in writing (or email). And never ever create a paper trail that could come back to haunt you. It's too late to undo what you did but never do anything so rash again.

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    If you must write a nastygram, write it in an editor rather than in your mail program, save it, set it aside, and decide several days later whether to send it, delete it, or send something more productive. Never hit send before calming down. – keshlam Jul 22 '16 at 14:03
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Short term with the company? Yes, I believe so. Long term no.

A recruiter's job is not to be pleasant and easygoing, their job is to find the best candidate for the position. Which means that you occationally run into someone that you will not have a good rapport with. Chalk this up as a learning experience, and in the future refrain from sending emails when you are emotional.

A simple:

Thank you for your time, after some consideration I have decided to withdraw my application

is more than enough.

Depending on your field you might run into these people again, either as clients, employers etc, they should remember you favourably or at least neutral when you do.

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    I wouldn't even bother with saying that you withdraw your application, just a simple thank-you note. If the job is offered you can always politely decline – Richard Says Reinstate Monica Jul 22 '16 at 12:23
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    @RichardU, It is a small world, even smaller when you get in to a specialized field. I have met former recruiters, colleagues and clients years after a working with them. A little politness is a small price to pay when dealing with people that could affect you down the road. – Charles Borg Jul 22 '16 at 12:29
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    I watched some people give a hard time to a supervisor because they were on loan to him, and not directly under him, and protected by a director. Well, the director was forced to resign, and guess who got promoted to director. Payback was swift and sure. Never make an enemy If you can avoid it. – Richard Says Reinstate Monica Jul 22 '16 at 12:59
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    Never make an enemy If you can avoid it. @RichardU But how is withdrawing your application making an enemy? That's normal. If anything it's more polite to let them know right away, so they can focus on other candidates, than waiting until an offer is made. – BSMP Jul 22 '16 at 14:42
  • @BSMP my comment about making enemies was about the chaps who harassed a supervisor, not about not responding unless an offer is tendered. – Richard Says Reinstate Monica Jul 22 '16 at 17:17
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Short answer: no

Long answer: As long as there are other companies in your area, you can simply apply somewhere else. Also, you shouldn't worry about his laughter because it's not your fault. The simple fact that he laughed throughout the interview shows that he has some psychological issues.

As an advice, I can tell you that long-winded emails in which you complain accomplish nothing. You could've simply told him that you found his attitude to be inappropriate and you wish to withdraw your application.

PS: This is just the beginning, you will meet a lot of freaks along the way so you should try to keep a stiff upper lip.

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    "This is just the beginning, you will meet a lot of freaks along the way so you should try to keep a stiff upper lip." - It sounds like this sort of advice would make him have a very short career wherever he goes. Writing passive aggressive emails post-interview in the safety of your home is sort of immature and not acceptable ever. If you are concerned about someone's excessive laughing it's best to handle it professionally rather than passive aggressively. – Dan Jul 22 '16 at 13:46
  • If there's a toxic work environment, then a short career in that company is the best solution in my opinion. It's better to search for employment elsewhere and find an environment where you can grow rather than put up with this kind of behaviour from a prospective employer. As for the passive aggressive emails, you should've quoted this: "As an advice, I can tell you that long-winded emails in which you complain accomplish nothing. You could've simply told him that you found his attitude to be inappropriate and you wish to withdraw your application.". – RelaxedArcher Jul 22 '16 at 14:11

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