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I have worked in luxury hotels for the past 4 years and within those 4 years have been transferred around through various line level positions in the rooms division. A year ago I started at my most prestigious hotel yet. Most recently about 2 weeks ago I was offered another lateral transfer within the same division. I accepted the transfer offer because they seemed eager for someone with my experience and it improved a couple of variables, such as a bit better hours and a .50 raise.

Before having been offered the transfer, I had been looking outside of the hotel industry for a better fit for quite some time. This last week, one of those external organizations I had applied with has reached out to me and is very interested in hiring me. This new position would offer a set schedule and alot more money.

My question is, would I be burning too many bridges by leaving this new position I was offered after just two weeks? Would it be unprofessional?

The biggest issue is that the new offer is for the DMO that advertises the hotel I currently work for. Could that be bad for future business?

Please help! Thank you!

closed as off-topic by HorusKol, gnat, scaaahu, Lilienthal, Jim G. Jul 25 '16 at 2:06

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  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – HorusKol, gnat, scaaahu, Lilienthal, Jim G.
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You get career progression, a better job, and more money? Yes. No question. Take the new job. If your current employer values you they will match (or exceed) your external offer. Do not disclose the details of your new offer, make your employer bid. You may end up with an even better deal.

Remember, the moment your employer needs to save money and cut jobs, your position is at risk. They will show no loyalty but will thank you for yours as you are shown the door.

There is nothing wrong with self interest. You owe your employer nothing but the service you agreed to perform. Evidently you have held up your end of the deal as they saw fit to give you a raise.

Offer your employer an opportunity to make a better offer. If they decline or come up short, take the new job.

You won't burn bridges with people who matter. Anyone who is offended at your departure is too small minded to be a concern later in your career.

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    Reminder: don't do anything irreversible until you have a written offer. – keshlam Jul 23 '16 at 22:54

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