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I started a new job on the 4th July this month and am due to get paid on Friday.

I earn £30,000 per year, which works out to be roughly £1,960 after taxes.

A family member said today that I may be working "in hand", which means I won't get a the full £1,960 this month - is this true? I'm slightly worried now, as have been budgeting for the full pay check.

If this work in hand thing is true, would it be stated in my contract? I've read it thoroughly and all it says is that I'm paid at the end of each month "in arrears".

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  • It depends on your contract - if you are paid in arrears, then you wont get paid for a full month in your first wage packet unless you join on the first day of that pay period. Sounds like you are only going to be down 3 days however. – Moo Jul 26 '16 at 17:39
  • Hi @Moo thanks for the quick response. Pay day is on the last working day of every month. I started on Monday 4th July, the only working day in July before that was the Friday beforehand. Does this mean I'll be down one day? – user54433 Jul 26 '16 at 17:40
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    Thats a question for your HR department as the standard differs from payroll company to payroll company (eg is your salary paid in 365th's or 261th's) – Moo Jul 26 '16 at 17:47
  • ' paid at the end of each month "in arrears" ' means simply that for any given month, you work first, then get paid. If you were paid for a month at the start of that month, that would be 'in advance' - not many places do this. Some places do 'in advance and in arrears', where you get paid for a month in the middle of that month/ – AakashM Jul 27 '16 at 9:05
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Speak to your HR department they are the only ones who can tell you how much you will be paid. Since you started on the 4th I would expect that your pay check will not include money for the 1st which was the only previous business day.

  • Thanks. So worst case scenario, since it doesn't mention "work in hand" in my contract, I will get paid the full wage except one day? – user54433 Jul 26 '16 at 17:49
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    Worst case you won't know until you talk to your payroll department. Seriously -- ask them! – thursdaysgeek Jul 26 '16 at 18:52
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The best bet is to ask the finance and/or HR department about the pay cycle and how it works for your company.

Most likely, you will be paid for the days worked between your first day to the last day of the pay cycle. The pay cycle usually ends about a week before pay day to allow the finance department time to process it.

So in your case, if the pay cycle ends some time around the 22nd you would be expecting just under 2/3rds of your normal monthly pay. Again, ask your finance and/or HR department and they should be able to give you a better idea of how it's going to work.

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As your contract says you are paid in arrears, then it is likely that you will not be paid for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd of July.

How much that corresponds to depends on your employers payroll, as its allowable to be paid on both 1/365th of your salary (calendar days), or 1/261th of your salary (working days).

That corresponds to a loss of either £246 for calendar based payroll or £114 for working day based payroll, both pre-tax.

Talk to your HR department.

  • I've started my job on 2nd may this year and I didn't get my full salary either even though the 1st of may was Sunday – kukis Jul 26 '16 at 19:10

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