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Basically i started working at a call center as a sales rep, 4 months later a position opened up and I took it, because I knew I had the skills to go along with it. Sales was always just for self-improvement for me.

Now when I last discussed the salary they told me they've been looking for a guy who had my background for an year and a half, since this background is in short supply in my country. This position is constantly getting a replacement. So they wanted to check me out first so we agreed that a slightly higher salary than the average I had as a rep would be reasonable for the beginning, but if I can do the job, that's going to change.

Now a month has passed and considering I'm getting a pat on my back for the good job every day and they've built a whole new system around the work I've done, I would say it's going pretty well.

This new system entails a higher salary for the reps, almost double, potentially triple. Now when we first discussed the salary we said we'd take a look at mine after 3 months and the level it was at when I left the rep position, my salary was always above average of the floor.

I'm not making money I could be making, its kinda hard to swallow the reality (cause you know...arrogance) that I am getting paid less than the reps but I have 50 times the responsibility and accountability. I also know they don't have a replacement for me, or it would take too much time and effort to find one. I also know that they gave me this job hoping I would stay for at least 2 years. Am I wrong to feel entitled to a bump? and if not, how am I supposed to approach this, cause laying it out like this is probably not a good idea, that would corner them.

Oh gurus from other workplaces answer my predicament

closed as off-topic by HorusKol, Jim G., Retired Codger, gnat, Rory Alsop Aug 2 '16 at 10:20

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    You don't want to wait the three months? – Kilisi Jul 30 '16 at 7:37
  • Not really, no. – Davidro Jul 30 '16 at 8:28
  • How long has it been and how long are you willing to wait? – jcm Jul 30 '16 at 8:43
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    Yes arrogance. You have 50 times the responsibility and accountability, they have built whole new system around the work you have done, and if you laid out your value you would corner them. Maybe tone it down a click and wait a whole 3 months. Give them chance to see your full value. – paparazzo Jul 30 '16 at 11:16
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    You'll have a much better negotiating position after you've demonstrated that you can do the job and stick to your word, in this case wating 3mo for the bump. At exactly 3mo and one day I would go to management and make your case but not one moment earlier. It may help to have another job offer in hand so you can walk away if they fail to agree that you have higher value. – acpilot Jul 30 '16 at 12:21
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You're being unreasonable. Three months is a very short time to wait before asking; usually raises occur once a year at most.

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    Most raises dont include a massive increase in responsabilities 1 month in either... – JS Lavertu Jul 30 '16 at 14:46
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    Most increases in responsibility don't come with a raise until you have proven you can handle those responsibilities. – keshlam Jul 31 '16 at 19:50
  • I agree with you, but one year of working with a salary 2-3x lower than it should be is not a regular situation – JS Lavertu Jul 31 '16 at 21:16
  • Accepting a job that underpaid in the first place would be abnormal -- assuming you are being realistic, which remains to be seen. – keshlam Aug 1 '16 at 1:07
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It looks as though you are making a shift from individual contributor to a more management or business systems role.

If so, you also need to shift your thinking to focus on the effects of your actions on profits. In this view, reorganizing around a system you proposed and increasing the sales reps' pay are both risks they are taking, in the hope and expectation that they will increase profits.

When you go into the negotiation for your long term pay you need to be talking about the quantitative benefit to your employer of the new system. I would be surprised if you could collect the numbers for that conversation in less than three months. That only allows about two months history of normal operation of the new system. One month seems far too little time for any serious measurement of whether your ideas are going to improve profits or not.

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