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I work in the IT Security profession as an IT auditor. My boss a couple of months ago recently suggested I enroll in the PCI Internal Security Assessor (ISA) program to become certified to conduct the annual PCI compliance certification. My employer like many places processes business online via payment cards. (Visa, MasterCards...etc) We are currently PCI level 3.

As per the PCI Council, this certification does not transfer to a new employer. One must also be sponsored by their employer to qualify as a PCI ISA. This certification is extremely relevant to what I do as a professional, assessing risk, but I am skeptical of putting it on my resume once earned, because I cant't use it without being re-sponsored by my new employer once leaving my old employer.

My Questions

How much value do certifications such this one add?

How can one best present non - transferable certifications if worthwhile on one's resume without misleading?

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How much value do certifications such this one add?

It depends on the employer.

Clearly those who sponsor such certifications value them. But obviously not all do.

If you apply to a new company who won't sponsor a certification - that's a good sign that they don't see much value. But that doesn't mean just listing it on a resume is a problem.

I am skeptical of putting it on my resume once earned, because I cant't use it without being re-sponsored by my new employer once leaving my old employer.

Put it on your resume - I don't see how it could hurt.

It could even be a point of discussion during your interview. If an interviewer asks about this certification, you could talk about it's value, indicate that it must be sponsored and find out if the new employer would be willing to do so.

At best, you'll be sponsored. At worst, you'll learn something about your new employer and have a discussion about what is important there, and what is not. That's always a good thing.

Overall, listing a certification that you currently hold isn't misleading. Many certifications need to be renewed or they lapse.

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Presumably you'd be moving to a company that understands PCI regulations, so they may already know that the certification cannot be transferred. But having it already does prove that you have the level of knowledge required to pass their examination. So I'd definitely put it on the resume.

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    Yes, and it is a strong expression of their trust in you, that they want you to get this certification. (And, I trust, to pay all of the costs of doing so.) It will be a valuable "feather in your cap." – Mike Robinson Aug 11 '16 at 14:13
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In several professions and industries, employment is often sought or discussed while a person remains in the process of obtaining a qualification or certification, which is required by the law or company policy in order to actually hold the position. Such qualifications are often marked by

Diploma in Necessary Thing (pending)

or a note to indicate they expect to be bestowed between the time of application and the time of appointments assumed.

Similarly, qualification and certification which does not transfer or which expires upon the end of a given employment, may be marked by

Important Knowledge Certificate (non-transferable)

or

Approval to Inspect Major Technical Stuff (expiring)

People familiar with these items will, as suggested, know what this implies for you as a holder of the certification, and for them as potential new employers wishing to make use of your skill/experience. People who aren't familiar will see clearly that this qualification cannot be relied upon for them, without additional research.

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