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I've had many jobs throughout my life and most of them I have been fired . How do I write my resume? Do I include all those jobs? And if I get called for an interview, do I tell the truth? There's no good explanation to the situations, but Im ready to do well . If given the chance...

marked as duplicate by Chris E, David K, gnat, jimm101, nvoigt Aug 12 '16 at 5:48

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    Could you (discreetly) describe why you've been fired so frequently? Is it something that is acceptable (by Western mores and folkways) such as layoffs due to rough times for the company, or disagreements with managers on product direction; or was it things that are not acceptable, like drinking on the job, punching your boss or sleeping with his wife, substance abuse, etc? – Cloud Aug 11 '16 at 18:54
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    I'm leaving this open. This is not a duplicate, this is for multiple firings, and I'm curious as to what answers could help this person. – Retired Codger Aug 11 '16 at 19:16
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    A bit more information: Have you been fired for insubordination? Fighting on the job? Stealing? Drugs? Tardiness? Give us some idea because the help we can give depends on the details. – Retired Codger Aug 11 '16 at 20:03
  • Also, is there a consistent pattern to the firings? If so, it may be possible to fix the problem that is causing them, and then convince a potential employer it is fixed. – Patricia Shanahan Aug 11 '16 at 20:55
  • @DevNull It's not common in Western culture to want to get fired. When someone is laid off, they don't say they were "fired" but actually laid off. Being laid off is common in Western culture and not a big deal. Being fire is, and in any other culture I'd imagine. – Dan Aug 12 '16 at 14:21
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You definitely have an uphill battle.

On your resume, include the relevant work experience, the dates you worked there, and the work you did/achievements you had. Just like any other job.

During an interview you should be asked about why you left those jobs. Absolutely tell the truth. You will have to explain it. If you don't explain it satisfactorily, you will not be hired.

The key here is to understand why you were fired. What did you do? What could/should you have done to avoid it? What have you already done to improve? What else are you going to do moving forward?

Until you can answer those questions, you, honestly, shouldn't be hired.

You have to take full responsibility. You should not try and blame managers, former co-workers, unfair policies, etc. I would never hire someone who had been fired from multiple jobs without taking ownership and responsibility for it. We all make mistakes, but if you don't prove that you've learned from those mistakes, why in the world would a manager expect that you're done making them?

  • That doesn't answer my question . maybe you should re read it . – XTina De Jesus Aug 16 '16 at 19:34
  • "How do I write my resume? Do I include all those jobs?" See 2nd sentence, starting with "On your resume...". "And if I get called for an interview, do I tell the truth?" See the bold sentence in the 3rd paragraph (Absolutely tell the truth). If you have more/specific questions, edit your question to include them. – Chris G Aug 16 '16 at 19:59
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If given the chance...

Every time you get a job you're being given a chance.

It's up to you to make the most of that chance.

I've had many jobs throughout my life and most of them I have been fired

That's the first thing to work on.

Is it possible that you're applying for jobs that don't fit you very well?

  • Some people want very quiet work with little responsibility, others want to make all the decisions and run the whole show.
  • Some people want to work with their hands, others plonk away at keyboards
  • Some people want a steady paycheck, others want to set their own hours
  • ... and so on
  • I friend of mine was fired a lot of times too. Her problem? she is unable to follow orders if a manager tell her to do something she doesnt like she wont do it. She is only 21 so I expect her to learn. Maybe op share this problem of just being young. – kifli Aug 12 '16 at 10:14
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    @kifli I don't see how insubordination is a symptom of being "young", none of my friends or coworkers were like that at that age. It's just a character flaw. – Chro Aug 12 '16 at 10:19
  • Understood, I get that , but can you answer my question? – XTina De Jesus Aug 16 '16 at 19:36

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