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I'm planning to apply to a company almost 2 years after I previously applied to them. They declined the last time by reasoning that they don't see me as experienced enough. Now 2 years later (after working for 2 years in that field where they have their business), I'm going to reapply.

I would like to use the same covering letter as I did 2 years ago, as it's just my experience and qualifications that have improved.

But the reasons why I like what the company is producing, why I think I would be a good fit to them by my personal characteristics, and how I got to know about them (AFAIK this are the things written into a covering letter here in Germany), didn't change in the last 2 years, and I still perceive this as being the best fit.

So should I rewrite it so just that it isn't the same wording? Or would it be okay to use the same covering letter again?

  • The company might have changed in the last two years. Have you taken into account in your letter how they have changed? Change meaning new technologies etc. – cst1992 Sep 12 '16 at 8:53
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    It's unlikely that someone would remember the cover letter of a failed applicant two years ago – Kilisi Sep 12 '16 at 9:50
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    Surely your experience from the last two years in the same industry will influence 'why you're a good fit for them'. – Dustybin80 Sep 12 '16 at 9:51
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    You sure can do better than 2 years ago. Whenever I see something I wrote a couple of years ago, I have ideas how to do it better today. – daraos Sep 12 '16 at 10:39
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    "Would it look bad using the same cover letter after 2 years?": No. "Should I rewrite my cover letter?": Yes. – Brandin Sep 12 '16 at 11:18
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A cover letter is your sales pitch. Last time they did not buy, but now you have improved and you are a way better deal.

Why would you want to hide this messages back in your CV. Why would you have them make a diff between the new and the old one to see that? Tell them.

Tell them about your good experience last time with them in the interview, tell them how you got more experience and what you did at the other company that could benefit them.

You could send the same cover letter and it might not be seen as negative. But that's not what you want. You don't want the same result as last time. You want positive. So go and craft a cover letter that tells them how much you improved and how good an idea it would be to hire you now even if they did not last time.

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  • Maybe I'm using the coverletter in a wrong way. but I'm just stating there what I did so far(ofcourse thois part is changed) And what my personal strengths and characteristcs are. (which didn't change) And I'm refering to a list in which I classify my skills and qualification as appendix(where there changed a lot in that list but not for the refference itself.) thats why I don't see a reason for updating the content of the coverletter but am uncertain about changing atleast the wording. – Zaibis Sep 12 '16 at 10:45
  • By the way I didn't have an itnerview with them. – Zaibis Sep 12 '16 at 10:46
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    @Zaibis You seem to be using your cover letter for basic facts that belong in your resume. The cover letter is your chance to target a particular employer. Why should they hire you? Why do you want to work for that company? What has changed since they considered you insufficiently experienced? – Patricia Shanahan Sep 12 '16 at 11:27
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    In this situation, with a previous rejection for insufficient experience, you need to call attention to additional experience you have gained that is relevant to the job. That should be at least one new paragraph, even if there is no other change. – Patricia Shanahan Sep 13 '16 at 1:07
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I would like to use the same covering letter as I did 2 years ago, as it's just my experience and qualifications that have improved.

That's the strangest reason for using the same cover letter I've ever heard.

1. Your resume is generic document - you send the same resume to different prospective employers.

2. The cover letter is a custom document where you specifically describe how your work experience, skills sets and interests are specifically relevant and in fact, particularly suited to the position offered by the prospective employer. The cover letter is how you introduce yourself in a personalized fashion to the employer and where you make your request for an interview.

What are you saying in your post, that the additional work experience and skills you acquired are irrelevant to the position offered by the company? If so, I agree that there is no need for you to update your cover letter.

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  • Well no, maybe I should read up what exactty the coverletter is made for but for now I listed my skills related to the position in an additional appendix, as I got multiple times feedback that my covering letters tempt to become too long to motivate to read through, so I should just stay basic in them and explain my personal traits related to a job. And these perosnal traits didn't change. While the appended list of my related skills did. This is the assumption, my question is based on. – Zaibis Sep 15 '16 at 11:41

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