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I'm asking on behalf of a person I know. Honest.

He's looking for a job, probably entry-level. This would be a good time to start searching out seasonal/holiday jobs. However, he's going to be out of state during the month of November. This opens up a number of issues.

1) Interviewers sometimes ask if the candidate has any "vacation" time planned. He'll have to say "Yes, the whole month of November." Is there anything he can do to counteract that?

2) I think he should try to get a temporary job where he'll be in November. He'll be living with a local family, but he won't be a resident. Will there be any legal issues that make this difficult?

3) When he gets back at the beginning of December, I suspect most holiday jobs will be already be filled. What industries or types of jobs are likely to still have openings?

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    There is nothing wrong with saying you have vacation planned. It may Lise you some jobs, but that's because you decided the vacation was more important to you, so that's nothing to complain about. – keshlam Sep 19 '16 at 1:56
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Forestry, labouring, cleaning, fruit picking, hostpitality, car park attendant, he'll have to look around. What jobs are available are pretty much dependent on locale, but there is almost always something, just perhaps not the sort of job he wants.

Find the local employment office in the area, they'll have a list of jobs many with immediate start.

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1) Interviewers sometimes ask if the candidate has any "vacation" time planned. He'll have to say "Yes, the whole month of November." Is there anything he can do to counteract that?

He could look for jobs that start in December.

It would be tough to find a job that starts off with one month on (October), followed by one month off (November), particularly an entry level job. But it depends on the value he brings, I suppose, and how much the employer is willing to bend.

2) I think he should try to get a temporary job where he'll be in November. He'll be living with a local family, but he won't be a resident. Will there be any legal issues that make this difficult?

No way to know the legal issues without knowing the specifics of the individual and the locale in question. When in doubt, consult an employment lawyer, or the local department of labor and/or attorney general's office.

3) When he gets back at the beginning of December, I suspect most holiday jobs will be already be filled. What industries or types of jobs are likely to still have openings?

In my part of the world there are always tons of temp jobs that go unfilled in the holiday season. Nationally, I hear that Kohl's is planning to hire 69,000 seasonal workers this year, UPS is hiring 95,000 and Target is hiring more than 70,000 . See: http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2016/09/19/business/ap-us-kohls-holiday-hires.html

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Interviewers sometimes ask if the candidate has any "vacation" time planned. He'll have to say "Yes, the whole month of November." Is there anything he can do to counteract that?

Nope, not for this one. It is best to be honest - there is the slim-chance if he is in the IT industry answering this may open up a telecommute opportunity if they like him enough. It will bar him from some jobs, but having his name out there for future consideration is never a bad thing.

I think he should try to get a temporary job where he'll be in November. He'll be living with a local family, but he won't be a resident. Will there be any legal issues that make this difficult?

Since you said State I am going to assume he is in the US - there is not legal implications, taxes are the only "issue" but it certainly does not mean he is going to end up paying more/double for it. This is a good primer on that topic

When he gets back at the beginning of December, I suspect most holiday jobs will be already be filled. What industries or types of jobs are likely to still have openings?

A lot of IT jobs have openings around that time - usually telemarketing/customer support, whatever the "hot" product is out there will typically bolster its Help Desk/CSR staff around that time to support a release. He can also check with his local Chamber of Commerce or any sort of placement agency - good bet on Retail, Department Stores, Supermarkets, etc having open positions.

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Start at the day labor office. Then you're actually working the jobs the employment office considers "open," because they still need done regardless of whose payroll you're on.

Further, because of the nature of temporary outsourced labor, you/your friend won't be leaving anyone in the lurch by taking November off.

This doesn't mean you can be unreliable; far from it. Keep your nose down, do as you're told even if the last warehouse stacked their fruit differently, accept what jobs you're offered and show up for the jobs you accept. You'll make friends at (of) companies all over town, and probably start getting repeat work tickets.

It sounds like having a job now is more important than having a job at a certain rate or industry. In my area you're more likely to work today, tomorrow, and the day after with a chance at direct hire at each company by getting in the day labor line an hour or two before the office opens than you are by spending all day applying through the employment office list without actually working.

Why? People are fired or quit, and after the first seasonal wave it is most economical to pay a flat, known rate to the labor office to provide "a worker." Be that worker, until you can't. Leave every day amicably.

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