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I'm applying to multiple IT jobs in local government cities. I've never been to a government job interview so I don't know what the etiquette are. Not even sure if my resume was suppose to be any different that a private company. Do they ask the same basic questions that most private companies ask? I just want to be prepared during the interview.

  • In my experience government jobs ask less problem solving questions (brain teasers).. so there is some difference. – FiringSquadWitness Oct 20 '16 at 4:42
  • It depends on the country the UK civil service uses a "board" system where you are normally interviewed by 2/3 people. – Pepone Oct 20 '16 at 7:33
  • In the US, your resume for federal positions can be as long as you want. (This may be a carry-over from the output of the USAJobs "resume builder," which is so terribly formatted that just the contact and education information takes up practically a whole page.) – MissMonicaE Oct 20 '16 at 17:02
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It can depend on location, but in general there is no difference. I have found govt to be more strict on qualification requirements, but that's about it.

  • I don't get the downvotes. This answer fits my experience in various countries. Of course, specifics may vary. – gazzz0x2z Oct 20 '16 at 9:14
  • A big factor in this is that government jobs generally give out pension and other benefits that are usually "better" than the general public. As such, people rarely leave a government position unless they're fired and even then they get fired more nicely than normal jobs. – Dan Oct 20 '16 at 16:05
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Private company interviews aren't all the same, and I would guess the same applies to government jobs. So I don't think there is an answer to your question. There may be regulations that apply to the position in the government job, but I have also worked in several private companies where there were significant government regulations that impacted the job.

Ideally the interview should be about your ability to do the job, regardless of the type of employer.

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