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As a student in my freshman year, I got into a very lucrative industry of selling MMO currency, accounts, and in game related services.

One year fast forward I have over 3000 monthly customers and am making 10x what my dad makes. Fast forward another year i quit my uni, i am renting 2 apartments filled with PCs and consoles botting games on software I wrote. Taught myself C#, .net. Made a killing for 5 years. Got great programming experience and skill.

All under the table. No reported income, never even made a company. 3rd world country i live in never cared for paypal money i was getting, never cared for me never paying taxes.

Last year i propose a girl. She wants me to do something more adult with my life. Im 29. I finish my school, graduate. Now i am officially a programmer that studied for 11 years and worked nowhere.

What can i put in my CV? How do i explain the 5 years gap? How do i make my knowledge and experience known?

marked as duplicate by mcknz, Chris E, WorkerWithoutACause, gnat, scaaahu Oct 21 '16 at 10:03

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    If it's so lucrative then why don't you invest your money into opening some other businesses on the side (legal ones)? Going from being your own boss, especially one who has the luxury of living very comfortably, to dealing with the BS of office politics, bullies, back stabbers, and working 9 to 5 is going to hurt. If I were doing well on my own I would never go back to working for someone else. Unless your business isn't doing well, or you feel that your legal risks are too high, I wouldn't get a job under someone else. The idea of "getting a real job" is quaint, and utterly naive. – AndreiROM Oct 20 '16 at 22:08
  • I would get sued into oblivion. The way I am doing business right now is the only possible way. And it is time for me to start thinking long term. I need to get "in the books" – johnny zb Oct 20 '16 at 22:11
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    I have a question. If you are really in a typical 3d world country barely holding together and where the law it is just waste of paper will your possible employer even care that you run a company out side the law ? provably there it is the rule and not exception. Provably even your future employer do a lot of illegal practices. – kifli Oct 21 '16 at 6:52
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    I don't understand why everyone assumes it's illegal. It might be illegal in the USA or Japan or somewhere, but that doesn't mean it's illegal locally. I'm in the third World, some of my clients think it's illegal for me to demand instant payment on my invoices or I turn off their services, and it is in their country (it's three weeks or something like that) but not here, so I couldn't care less. – Kilisi Oct 21 '16 at 13:30
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    @kilisi - include a page on your website about "cultural differences", lol. – AndreiROM Oct 21 '16 at 13:42
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You ran a private business. Whether you filed paperwork or not doesn't matter from the point of view of the CV.

Established and ran a private business in the MMO gaming industry, providing services to more than 3000 customers a month. Developed scripts and analysis routines in C# and .NET.

Etc.

(I have no idea how background checks work in your country, however.)

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    In addition to this - set up a project portfolio with all your projects and highlight particular technologies used and interesting solutions. – HorusKol Oct 20 '16 at 22:09
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Simple, register your business if you must and you now have a legit taxable income.

Option 2, tell your gf to wake up, you're making a lot of money, and you won't make that much as a programmer, so does she want the good life or does she want to struggle?

Option 3, get any sort of job just to keep her happy.

Option 4, get a gf with a more realistic outlook on life in the third World. 29 years old is not a great time to limit your potential. You need a partner who supports you 100% to get ahead, not one that will hold you back. That's a huge part of getting married.

  • Selling MMO currency is breaking the ToS of every game out there. It'd be like trying to register a business that sells cracked copies of photoshop. – Erik Oct 21 '16 at 5:36
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    @Erik it's the third World, probably no one would understand or care. You know all those online University degrees for sale, third World is where you can actually get a business licence using them, or just make your own in photoshop. – Kilisi Oct 21 '16 at 6:07
  • OP mentioned in a comment that if he made his business legit, he would be sued into oblivion. – Erik Oct 21 '16 at 8:14
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    @Erik depends how he did it. Be silly to put himself in the firing line, but registering a business that 'Provides gaming services' would be fine. Then since he's being paid by paypal he couldn't be audited properly and could slip in under whatever goods and services taxes there are. There's several other benefits as well, grants, loans... all sorts of things. – Kilisi Oct 21 '16 at 8:18
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    I hear the OP wanting to give up a life of comfort to become just another working stiff, and I cringe. I had the exact same thoughts about the GF, by the way. My recommendation would be to get in touch with a lawyer/financial expert and let them do the heavy lifting on "going legit". – AndreiROM Oct 21 '16 at 13:01
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Be brave! And remember: discretion is the better part of valor.

You just graduated college? Then there's no real gap to explain. Had you driven a cab for five years before deciding to go to school, it wouldn't be relevant experience to put on your resume.

Aim for an entry level job where you're not expected to have experience. Because of your experience of entrepreneurial spirit you will progress quickly given those expectations. Or start your own business. Or find a start-up that needs a founder CTO.

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