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I work at a large IT company as a junior software developer (in Denmark), yesterday my team lead offered me to take a scrum master course and certification, which I of course accepted right away, because - why not.

My question is how I can make this benefit the most? I come from a different background than IT and am not religious at all about it, I just wanna make the most out of my situation. Safer job oppertunities, better pay ect. Is it a good idea to split my focus beyond developing, or just to take the course and smile and wave.

My apologies if the question becomes a little vague. Im not searching for a final answer, just advise pointers and thoughts.

Cheers

closed as off-topic by gnat, Chris E, jimm101, IDrinkandIKnowThings, JasonJ Oct 28 '16 at 19:51

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  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – gnat, Chris E, jimm101, IDrinkandIKnowThings
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Your first question, does it make sense, is from whose perspective? From your managers perspective... it depends on a lot of things, such as whether they plan on having you involved in an agile team. If a company is raving about Agile I have seen some train the entire workplace on its processes before, even those who are barely involved and will never lead a team.

From a personal perspective, it makes sense to take it as the training has some value. It will look good on your CV and it will help you to understand and implement Agile processes. Agile is a big buzzword in the industry so it will give you a useful skill that is backed up with certification.

For your other question, I would suggest trying to get as much out of it in the workplace as possible. Get involved in the Agile processes, work on software processes like implementing things like continuous integration that will help the company be more agile, setting yourself up for sprint demos, etc.

The more you're involved in this the more value you will have when interviewing for a more senior position.

  • Thank you. These are exactly the kinds of thoughts I was looking for. – ToFo Oct 28 '16 at 7:11
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It's an excellent opportunity. Jump on it.

From your companies point of view, not only could you become a scrum master (which is an important job, that must be done by someone who knows what he or she is doing, but in a smaller team may be only a part time job), it is also good for everyone in a team to know what exactly the job of a scrum master is, even if it is not your role.

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    Regarding the last point, some companies rotate the scrum master every sprint, so it's important for everyone to know how to perform the role. – NibblyPig Oct 28 '16 at 8:25

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