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I have only had one shift (induction) at my new job but i really didn't enjoy it. It's only a part time sunday shift at a retail store but I didn't like the people and the tasks involved. I know many people will say give it time, everyone hates their first shift but I still have my old job as I decided not to resign unless i enjoyed it. I didn't know how to go about resigning as i have only had one shift, wasn't sure if i should call the store or hand in a letter on my next shift which will be in 3 days.

Thankyou x

marked as duplicate by The Wandering Dev Manager, jimm101, JasonJ, mcknz, Philip Kendall Nov 3 '16 at 18:07

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    Call your "new" boss and tell him the job isn't a good fit. He will value knowing sooner rather than later. – Lumberjack Nov 3 '16 at 16:18
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Let your boss know as soon as possible. Waiting until your next shift will cause more inconvenience for your boss, as they will be scrambling to cover the shift. And there's no benefit for you in waiting, anyway.

In person or on the phone is preferable for an important communication such as a resignation. You should do it this way if possible. It's less pleasant for you, but learning to be able to do this is a good skill.

Also, I think it's worth mentioning that you acted unprofessionally in officially accepting a job but not really being fully committed to take it. The expectation of employers would be that accepting a position means you actually plan to do it, and have freed yourself from any conflicting obigations--not that you will start working and only then make up your mind. Yeah, I know it's a low-level service job, the employer's commitment to you is minimal, and there is turnover all the time, but still, I don't think this is an acceptable course of action. It's going make a bad impression on the people involved. That may not cost you now at this level, but doing this with a higher level position could be quite detrimental to your career.

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    It's not unprofessional at all. – Strawberry Nov 3 '16 at 17:40
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    @Strawberry, it is exceedingly unprofessional. – HLGEM Nov 3 '16 at 18:13

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