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I have been working with Dynamics CRM in my company for six months and I really enjoy it. But I am at a possible crossroad to do something else, like frontend development, more intense .NET/C# and more.

I aim at going all in with Dynamics CRM (and the .NET/C# that comes with it). From what I hear its "the future" and sounds very prosporous, but is it a viable long-term goal to become an expert in?

I ask in this forum to get an updated answer. I have googled similar questions which have positive answers, but they are a few years old, which ofc. is a lifetime in the software industry.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Philip Kendall, Rory Alsop, Masked Man, jimm101, JasonJ Nov 4 '16 at 12:41

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    I literally LOLed at "from what I hear its 'the future'". God, no one I know would touch Dynamics CRM with a barge pole, and I dropped it after version 4. Use your .Net skills to make your skillset more diverse - ASP.Net, WPF etc etc. Thats your "future". – Moo Nov 4 '16 at 10:46
  • Allright, so what makes it so bad or undesirable? And do you thing that this is a shared or general opinion? – ToFo Nov 4 '16 at 10:54
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    Diversify, diversify, diversify. – jimm101 Nov 4 '16 at 11:03
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    ToFo - being limited to one specialisation means your future is determined by the success or otherwise of that specialisation. Diversification protects you. – Rory Alsop Nov 4 '16 at 11:38
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    Rory might be correct in his comment here, but there remains the fact that SQL/SharePoint/C# aren't technologies that are going to fail at any point soon. Enterprise level applications are likely to stick with the most robust technologies. – Snow Nov 4 '16 at 11:59
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Yes, it's still viable. You're working with C#, CRM, business logic, SharePoint, SQL (I assume). All of these skills are transferrable to later technologies if you decide to move on.

If you're enjoying where you are, stay and grow until you're no longer enjoying it. There's a lot of cool new things out there, but you have the core skills right there. SQL/SharePoint/C# aren't going away any time soon.

I learnt COBOL back in the 80's, it's still a viable platform that's powering more than you think it does.

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    I'm currently doing COBOL to migrate platform from AIX to Postgres, but still powered by cobol, furthermore GnuCobol is a project very active at the moment. – Walfrat Nov 4 '16 at 10:03

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