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I have read numerous questions that do not address this specifically. In any case, I have received an invitation to interview but not interviewed yet, attempted reasonable contact and have waited a reasonable amount of time. See comments below where I refute claims of duplication.

BACKGROUND: I received a request from an internal recruiter for a phone interview and a time to do so. I responded the next day, suggesting that day was not good and opened up my availability for the next several days as well as offred up a suggested set time the day after the next. I received no response. As the suggested time approached without response, I called the recruiter and wanted to make sure I had not missed something so I could be available. He was unclear, but implied he hadn't heard from the person doing the interview, who is a technical supervisor not a hiring manager. I waited a week or so and received no response. I sent one more followup politely requesting more information either way.

THE QUESTIONS ARE: In the above scenario, 1.) do I only continue to try and contact the unresponsive recruiter and 2.) should I only use email or go to phone calls with them? 3.) How long should I wait to escalate and contact the supervisor? 4.) Should I contact the supervisor by email, phone or a message with the receptionist?

CLOSING NOTES: Yes, I already know to continue on in the meantime. Yes, I would still work for them after not receiving a reply. Yes, I know they hired a recruiter to schedule interviews as part of their duties so that the supervisor wouldn't have to deal with candidates. Also, the position is still listed and there is no closing date. The original invitation implied a desire to schedule the interview as soon as possible (but not urgently). I am not sure if the recent elections here in the U.S. have affected the process or not.

marked as duplicate by Richard Says Reinstate Monica, gnat, keshlam, TrueDub, Chris E Nov 17 '16 at 15:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • How might the recent US elections have affected interviews for this position? Was it for the HRC transition team? – Nolo Problemo Nov 16 '16 at 23:40
  • I feel like I'm taking crazy pills. Two Downvotes?! No, this question is not addressed by another post that deals with an interviewer not calling at a scheduled time. I am asking about layers in the chain of command. This is not just a "how long do I wait" or a "I haven't heard anything since the interview" question either. I have waited, I have not interviewed, there is not just the recruiter involved. This seems to be a problem involving extraneous circumstances such as a vacation, illness, resignation, or undxpected workload. I want to poke the situation, but don't want to bother anyone. – user58446 Nov 17 '16 at 7:47
  • @NoloProblemo I could imagine that a company may hold off on hiring until factors determining future tax and employment policies / laws are solidified. These two campaigns were antiparallel on taxes. Yes, I know every election involves discussion of taxes and employment. In this case, there was an unexpected upset in the results. Of course there are many situations where they need to hire a person regardless of the politica, environment, and they also probably foresaw (and took into account) the upcoming election before posting the position. It was just something to consider. – user58446 Nov 17 '16 at 7:54
  • @NoloProblemo Obviously, real policy change cannot occur until the President-elect takes office and either fulfills or recants on their promises, but the election results offer a company some insight into how the future environment will look. – user58446 Nov 17 '16 at 8:00
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YES, they would leave someone inexplicably clueless. Happens all the time. The recruiter could be on vacation, or the manager, or they could have a freeze, or any number of reasons. The end result is aggravating, yes. But you are not unique.

You can call back, but be careful to not frustrate yourself.

  • Call the recruiter again or the supervisor directly? Guess that depends on who is on vacation. How long should I wait after my last email to the recruiter? – user58446 Nov 16 '16 at 0:49
  • That's totally up to you, and how desperate (smile) you are to get into a new job. Weekly? – Xavier J Nov 16 '16 at 1:16
  • Oh, I am desperate :D I hope they don't smell it through the phone. So far, I've played it cool, but I am afraid the opportunity may pass. It stands to reason that if either the recruiter or the supervisor was looking to get this taken care of, it would be. – user58446 Nov 16 '16 at 1:23
  • @user58446 follow up, but as codenoir said, this happens so often that it's almost a cliché` Get ready to move on if you get bad news. The exact same thing happened to me earlier this year. Send out more resumes and be prepared for the worst, but hope for the best. – Richard Says Reinstate Monica Nov 16 '16 at 13:22
  • @RichardU Thank you all for taking the time to read my question. But perhaps I was not clear: there is no doubt I will followup some way, and be prepared for disappointment. It has been 72 hours since my last attempt at contact and two weeks since contact from them. THE QUESTIONS ARE: In the above scenario, 1.) do I only continue to try and contact the unresponsive recruiter and 2.) should I only use email or go to phone calls with them? 3.) How long should I wait to escalate and contact the supervisor? 4.) Should I contact the supervisor by email, phone or a message with the receptionist? – user58446 Nov 16 '16 at 20:47

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