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I recently received an offer for my dream job, signed the letter, and proceeded with the on-boarding process.

One of the important things I had to do was pick a start date. I nominated December 12th. However, I then flip-flopped it back to December 19th as the start date.

The recruiter got back to me and said because of the holidays, the week of December 19th will be slow and ramping up will be difficult. She then proposed that it would make sense to delay the start date right after New Years, which I agree with.

My question is that did I make a wrong move to flip-flop my start date decision from the 12th to the 19th? Or perhaps I should have picked an earlier date (I wanted to wrap up my projects at my current company and it is also Thanksgiving next week)? Or perhaps starting after the New Years is optimal because everyone will be in office.

When I start working after New Years, it will be 6 weeks since I signed the letter and begin to work there.

What do you guys think?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Philip Kendall, Justin Cave, mcknz, gnat, nvoigt Nov 18 '16 at 7:05

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Don't over think it. It's not a big deal. I delayed the start date of my very first job offer to have a holiday. The start date doesn't usually make a big difference for the employer. If it does, they'll let you know. – Allen Zhang Nov 18 '16 at 2:27
  • "What do you guys think" isn't something that can reasonably be answered. Is there some reason that 6 weeks between signing the letter and starting is bad? – Justin Cave Nov 18 '16 at 2:27
  • This is subjective and hypothetical, so it's hard to provide a definitive answer. One person might really want a delay between projects, while another person might want to start quickly to make an immediate impression. FWIW I think you made the right choice. But that's just me. – mcknz Nov 18 '16 at 2:33
  • When you "nominated" Dec 12, did you sign the contract saying you'll start on Dec 12, and then verbally decided to go Dec 19? – Nelson Nov 18 '16 at 2:37
  • I don't think this is on topic but even if it is, there's not enough information to form an opinion. It's not clear what you're worried about happening as a result of having this new start date. – BSMP Nov 18 '16 at 3:12
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They suggested delaying it until after New Year's. If that were a problem for them, I doubt they would have suggested it. I wouldn't worry about it.

That being said, watch for any benefits or other things that might be delayed or lost if you move your date back. I assume you're in the US since you talk about Thanksgiving being next week -- at many workplaces your health insurance doesn't start until the beginning of the month following your hire date, so you wouldn't have your new healthcare coverage until February - but you might lose your old one at the end of December if you leave your current job in that month.

The other thing I can think of - at my workplace, you get two "floating holidays" if you're there as of January 1st. I started a few weeks into January, and it wasn't pro-rated. So I worked nearly as long as everyone else and got two fewer days off. Annoying, but not deal-breaking. Just something to keep in mind.

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