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I work as the sole web dev in a medium sized company. I have been performing well, and have been told in the past that another department head wishes to poach me to his team.

I was recently informed that I will soon be removed from under my current report to the person who wanted me, who leads a different team. This is news to my boss, who is sorry to see me leave. Aside from a change of direct report, my role will not be changing, at least on paper, and I will continue to be the sole subject matter expert in the company on my area.

How should I negotiate a pay raise or change in my workplace agreement given that I will be forced to sign a new contract to work under my new manager?

What right do I have to negotiate / push back on an offer presented in this way?

  • Is this within Australia? You'll have to tag it if that's the case because different countries handle contracts differently. Note that we can't answer if you really have a choice, that depends on your employer. – Lilienthal Nov 30 '16 at 8:29
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    Can you also clarify what "right" you mean? Ethically? Legally? – Lilienthal Nov 30 '16 at 8:30
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    Are you really signing a new contract for this? Usually moving to a new boss doesn't involve contracts. – Erik Nov 30 '16 at 9:02
  • New contract = new term => negociation as for the first question, you have a lot of material here if you need: workplace.stackexchange.com/questions/1025/… – François Gautier Nov 30 '16 at 13:57
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How should I negotiate a pay raise or change in my workplace agreement given that I will be forced to sign a new contract to work under my new manager?

What right do I have to negotiate / push back on an offer presented in this way?

You haven't mentioned your locale, and "rights" vary accordingly.

But in the US at least, you always have the right to say "You know, something here at work changed, and consequently I'd like to renegotiate a new salary and benefits."

And your employer always has the right to say "No thanks. We no longer need your services. Goodbye."

Customarily, being transferred to a new department but performing the same role doesn't imply a raise. But you can always ask and find out what will happen in your company.

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You always have the right to negotiate (e.g. asking for a payraise, or a company car), you just don't have the right to claim it. But in this case, you only switch bosses, not jobs, tasks or responsibilities.

Image the new boss' impression: "This person comes to me, asking for more money, without actually doing something else". This could give off the impression you only do this for money, or that you'll only accept the team-change if you get payed (apperantly you're not really flexable).

If you want to negotiate, I'd wait an amount of time to see how this team works, how this boss works. After an apropriate amount of time, you can start a converstation that you'd like ....(more money?) and what the possibilities are.

  • If at a later time you decide to renegotiate, that's when this question begins to apply. – David K Nov 30 '16 at 12:52
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The only situation I'd recommend serious push back on this is if there is a drastic negative difference in the quality of management between teams. If that is the case, then attempting to renegotiate is a reasonable step on your part as your quality of work life is taking a hit so it's worth taking a shot for higher compensation to balance this.

If this is the case, the conversation should be with your current manager and HR and should go along the lines of "Really wanting to work for my current manager was taken into account as a benefit when my compensation was last negotiated. Me being switched to team X provides great opportunity for growth however it also entails the loss of this benefit. I'd like to renegotiate my compensation package to account for this."

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