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I started a DevOps position about 6 months ago at a company that I've been with for 7 years. This company is also footing the bill for a good chunk of my graduate school tuition, and I expect to finish the last two classes by next year (another 5 months).

It's shocking and frustrating to me that I haven't learned that much during my time here despite this hot-title job. There is not enough work to do, very little cross training, and generally an atmosphere of boredom and gloom amongst my colleagues. I think I have maybe 3 things to add to my resume. I'm convinced that it's just a stagnant company culture and I'm ready to move on. But sometimes I wonder if it's my fault and I'm missing the picture?

I've already voiced my concerns to my boss, but he just tells me to "sit over someone's shoulder" and watch what they do. I hate bugging people to show me things. Our organization touts that we use all the latest hot technologies, but I find myself never or rarely getting any hands-on exposure to them.

If I look for a new job, I might jeopardize finishing up my CS degree, but some days I have a burning desire to find something more engaging. How can I explain this to a future employer?

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But sometimes I wonder if it's my fault and I'm missing the picture?

If you've been bored to tears and haven't learned anything for 6 months, there's certainly fault on both sides here.

If I look for a new job, I might jeopardize finishing up my CS degree

So you get to decide what is more important to you and how long you want to remain. You get to decide if you can afford to leave now or can put up with the boredom for another 5 months.

but some days I have a burning desire to find something more engaging. How can I explain this to a future employer?

Needing more challenge is a common reason folks state for why they want to leave their current position.

  • Just to clarify, I've been in this role for 6 months only, the last 7 years I was in very different less technical roles. I certainly learned a lot in those positions, but I want a career in software development/ operations, which is why I'm unhappy with this situation. – astra Dec 1 '16 at 16:01
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There is not enough work to do, very little cross training, and generally an atmosphere of boredom and gloom amongst my colleagues.

I hate bugging people to show me things.

If everyone else is as bored as you are, I would think they would welcome the opportunity to talk about what they do, have you learn the basics, etc. - if for no other reason than it's different from the day-to-day routine.

If the shoulder-surfing turns you off, organize a weekly lunch-and-learn. A different person each session describes one particular task or challenge, and teaches the others how to deal with it.

  • That's a great idea. Sounds like what's lacking is someone to take on a leadership role to make this happen. Maybe this is something OP can do, and it's another bullet point for his resume. – user41891 Dec 1 '16 at 21:47
  • I think I would not be very pleased to talk about my very boring job. – phresnel Jan 23 '18 at 13:27

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