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I worked for Company A for two years but resigned because of a bad boss. This person was later fired, and now the new boss wants me back. They are offering me a salary higher than what I was earning while I was there. I left on good terms with all the rest of the staff.

What factors should I consider before responding to their offer?

closed as off-topic by Masked Man, Jonast92, JasonJ, Lilienthal, Chris E Dec 16 '16 at 15:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – Masked Man, Jonast92, JasonJ, Chris E
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    This question will likely be closed as off-topic, as it is asking "What should I do". You might instead ask "What factors should I take into account in making my decision as to whether to accept the offer" – but that will then likely be closed as a duplicate. However, a few minutes of searching I have failed to find an exact duplicate, so maybe the question is worth asking. – Bill Michell Dec 16 '16 at 13:19
  • Possible duplicate of My ex-employer wants me back. How should I evaluate? – Lilienthal Dec 16 '16 at 14:33
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    After the edit this is basically a duplicate. The fact that the bad boss is gone is just a positive factor to add to the pro/con breakdown. – Lilienthal Dec 16 '16 at 14:34
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    Would you have left the company if you had a different boss? I see it as a pretty simple situation. Analyze why you left and consider what it would have taken for you to stay. That's what you want out of them. Since they want you back and they've offered you something tangible (more money) perhaps you can get something less tangible, like a better title (or higher grade). You could also inquire if you can get a restoration of seniority for benefits. – Chris E Dec 16 '16 at 15:37
  • The question is too ambiguous and does not appear well thought out, please reflect on what matters to you. You could propose factors and ask how to prioritize them, for instance, or whether you are not thinking of something after mentioning a variety of things you already are. As currently written it seems the only concern is a "good" or a "bad" boss, and that is clearly too simplistic a criterion for an employment decision that is missing a lot of context. – A.S Dec 16 '16 at 15:57
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Approach it like you would any other job offer, only this time you have a lot more information to go off of.

How does Company A compare to your current Company B? Would you have liked the job at Company A if you didn't have a bad boss? Do you know/like the new boss? How does the salary compare with Company B? Commute? Benefits? Career growth? The list can go on forever, but only you know what factors are the most important.

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    +1, you are in the perfect position of having just about as much information as it's possible to have about a change. – mxyzplk Dec 16 '16 at 15:05

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