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I'm a software engineer with 15 years of experience in web development, database development and engineering, and many other things including x86 assembly language.

I have been working outside the US for the past 2 years in various web development positions focusing mainly on Google App Engine-hosted web services. I've been pretty satisfied with my current job but it's nowhere close to what the US offers. Out of nowhere, I received an invitation from a large online retail company for attending a hiring event here in my city, with the final objective of relocating me to Seattle if I pass the interview.

Well I should say that this invitation is better than anything I have dreamed of, and I really want to get this job. I have two questions I really wish that you can help me with:

Does receiving an invitation mean anything? I mean do they have any preference for me or was it just an automated message sent to everybody? Keeping in mind that my current job (outside the US) I had it through a similar invitation. I wasn't even looking for a job. I was simply offered double my current income and I passed a very simple interview easily.

closed as off-topic by Lilienthal, Chris E, gnat, Masked Man, Rory Alsop Jan 1 '17 at 21:56

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  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Jane S Jan 2 '17 at 7:42
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Does receiving an invitation mean anything?

Yes it means you have been invited to an interview.

I mean do they have any preference for me or was it just an automated message sent to everybody?

Clearly the invitation was not sent to everybody. You met some selection / search criteria. You have no more preference than the other people that received the invitation.

As for prepare there are many books on Amazon Web Services. If you cannot find any locally you can order on Amazon.

  • 1
    do you have any specific experience with Amazon interviews? – Ahmed Dec 31 '16 at 20:44
  • Interviews are interviews. Understand the company. Understand what position you are applying for. Prepare and practice to explain why you are an exceptional candidate for this position. Know what you need from them. – keshlam Jan 1 '17 at 7:02
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It's a real invitation. Amazon and other tech firms are constantly searching for talent. There is huge demand for capable developers worldwide, and it's still the case that most CS gradates can't program. There are thousands of open positions for developers in Seattle at Amazon and Google and many other companies. It's not competitive in the sense that there are multiple people interviewing for one position. There are far more open positions than qualified candidates. Not everyone wants to move to Seattle or San Francisco, so companies open offices worldwide to attract more talent. The interview and the hiring bar will be about the same everywhere.

  • "There are far more open positions than qualified candidates" ... "so companies open offices worldwide to attract more talent" Can you support your argument with references? – Khalil Khalaf Jan 2 '17 at 0:50
  • @Kyle: check the websites of any of the big tech companies for open positions. This does not mean that they will hire anyone with a CS degree or industry experience. I've interviewed many CS graduates who couldn't program at all. – kevin cline Jan 2 '17 at 4:14

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