-1

Why do recruiters always ask candidates how they feel about the interview they just had? It seems like a pointless question. The answer is certainly "I think it went pretty well, and I hope to get the job!" And yet, the recruiters always ask right before they break the news.

RECRUITER: How do you feel about the interview you had yesterday?
CANDIDATE: I think it went pretty well, and I hope to get the job!
RECRUITER: That's swell. Unfortunately, the team decided ...

or

RECRUITER: How do you feel about the interview you had yesterday?
CANDIDATE: I think it went pretty well, and I hope to get the job!
RECRUITER: That's swell. The team decided to make an offer ...

Like seriously, what is the point of asking that? Do they teach that in recruiter university? Just give the news: did the candidate get the job or not!

closed as off-topic by Masked Man, gnat, Rory Alsop, Michael Grubey, keshlam Jan 8 '17 at 5:37

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • It makes it less awkward than "Hi, this is RECRUITER, you didn't get the job, sorry!" to have a bit more conversation? – enderland Jan 7 '17 at 0:22
  • 3
    The last paragraph makes this more like a rant than a real question. – Brandin Jan 7 '17 at 0:37
  • 1
    Candidate: I think it could have gone better. I have such depth and breadth of experience and so many "success stories" that I never know which to discuss during the limited time of an interview. – James Olson Jan 7 '17 at 14:16
  • 2
    "I liked the interview, but I don't think this job is for me". Keep in mind BOTH SIDES have to accept the (potential) job offer. You're assuming that it's a given that you still want the job after the interview. That's only if you're desperate. – Erik Jan 7 '17 at 16:04
3

You think there are two possible outcomes: You get the job, or you don't.

In reality, there are three possible outcomes: You get the job, you don't get the job but are put on a list of good candidates that should be contacted if something goes wrong, or you don't get the job and are put on a list of candidates that are not worth interviewing again.

Your reaction may very well decide which list you are going on. Remember that if you don't get the job today, maybe the person that was offered the job rejects it, and you might get a call the next week.

2

Same reason they ask anything: to see how you will respond, and to see how good you are at reading social cues.

0

Maybe it's a less cynical world view, but good recruiters would care about the mental health of applicants for jobs they're recruiting for: if a few applicants had bad experiences during an interview, then it's anonymous feedback they could share with the recruiting company.

The recruiters also have an incentive to make sure their applicants have good experiences, as applicants with good experiences with a recruiter would likely refer their friends and peers to that recruiter.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.