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My job applications are rejected every single time, be it in a top level company or a less renowned one. I am not even offered an interview be it an application for a full-time job or an internship. I have reviewed my resume several times and even asked professionals to review it. Most of the time the reason being a lack of experience in a full-time company. I am a graduate and have undertaken several research jobs at the university that have turned out to be some really good contributions to the field along with journal publications. How do the companies expect us to have (or gain) an experience when they are not ready to offer a job to the newbie. What should I do to have them offer me an interview let alone the job?

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    Hello, welcome to the Workplace. We answer specific situations, questions like "What should I do" are not practical answerable questions. Please take the Tour to understand how we function.
    – Thalantas
    Jan 18, 2017 at 13:34
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    I guarantee I have been rejected more times than you, over 1000 times. It's a numbers game, just keep plugging away. Jan 18, 2017 at 13:35
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    @RichardU Not great advice. When it comes to flat-out rejections like OP is describing the issue is quality, not quantity. OP should apply to jobs he is suited for, which is presumably what he isn't doing. How you determine that has been discussed on this site and elsewhere many times before.
    – Lilienthal
    Jan 18, 2017 at 13:43
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    Are you applying for entry level jobs?
    – JasonJ
    Jan 18, 2017 at 13:46
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    You're not really asking a question that can be answered ... just keep networking and putting yourself out there. Sometimes unpaid activities can lead to job offers. Jan 18, 2017 at 13:49

3 Answers 3

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A couple of things that you may need to do:

  1. Your CV clearly isn't selling your skills
  2. You need to flesh out your research jobs as these should suffice as "Work Experience"
  3. Are you tailoring covering letters/CV's for each role?

If you are getting flat out rejections for jobs then your application is not selling yourself. You cite that experience is coming up, well that means the roles you are applying for aren't junior enough, or that there is a lack of jobs in the field so more experienced people are applying for junior jobs.

You need to sell your research jobs better, you need a better CV and you need some luck. The first hurdle is usually the hardest one to jump.

Can you give an indication as to what field you are working in? It may allow others to offer industry specific advice?

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  • I belong to the Biomedical engineering field.
    – dykes
    Jan 18, 2017 at 16:06
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Most of the time the reason being a lack of experience in a full-time company.

This would indicate that you are targeting the wrong jobs. Instead, look for jobs that are truly entry-level, and thus don't require any experience in a full-time company. You might need to widen your target.

I am a graduate and have undertaken several research jobs at the university that have turned out to be some really good contributions to the field along with journal publications.

So that gives you some obvious networking possibilities with research project advisors and coworkers. Often, the best jobs come through your personal network, not through just responding to job ads.

How do the companies expect us to have (or gain) an experience when they are not ready to offer a job to the newbie.

For companies that don't want to hire newbies, that's not their problem - it's your problem. Instead, find companies willing to hire new graduates. Your college placement office can usually help.

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I'm assuming you're a recent graduate (within the last year) and in the US for this answer.

What should I do to have them offer me an interview let alone the job?

You can't force them to offer an interview or a job, but like others have stated you can sell yourself better in order to get the interview or job.

I'd suggest turning to your university for networking, job postings, and help. Universities want their students to be successful and find jobs. Do they offer any networking events where employers come to the campus? These are great events to hand someone your resume IN PERSON and make a personable impression!

Many schools have a careers website with job postings. These postings are clearly looking for entry-level employees or willing to hire new graduates with little to no experience. At my university, the business school students were very aware of this site but I found most other majors outside of the school of business had no idea it even existed, so I'd check and see if there is such a thing.

Also, your university may have a career help center where you can sit with an adviser and go through your resume and CV with you line by line and even word by word. They will usually have great resources for you in numerous aspects of finding a job.

It can be rough and take time but you will find a job! Good luck!

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