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I am a software professional in a niche industry for 4 years, looking at other industries for new jobs.

I've been working in my spare time on iOS apps for under a year. Published one, maybe a month away from publishing the second.

I'm on a job search website were you register interest in a company and they can respond to you.

One company I registered interest in is an iOS start-up that is asking for 3+ years working as a mobile developer. They got back asking if I wanted to set up a call with the CTO.

Do I mention my lack of relevant experience now, in my reply, in order to save everyone some time?

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    No need to be explicit about that, just send a CV. If you can show that you have the required skills then they will almost certainly waive the 3+ years requirement (at least this is how things worked for me in the past). After all they have approached you, and from your post I gather that you have some kind of profile on the jobs site that piqued their interest. – Eike Pierstorff Jan 23 '17 at 10:37
  • I was in a similar situation when applying for my current job. I'd been working in my first job out of college for three years, but I had been in an environment where there were no more senior software developers working with me and I'd had to muddle through as effectively the lead developer right away. So even though I had three years on paper, I felt more like a one-year junior developer. I didn't mention that when applying for my current job, but I did bring it up at my interview. – Jonathon Cowley-Thom Jan 23 '17 at 11:33
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    One downside was that even though they offered me the job, with hindsight I now feel four years later that they probably low-balled me on the salary - something I was okay with at the time. But I'm now in a position where I've grown as a developer and enhanced my skills and increased my value, but my salary hasn't caught up with me because it was on the low side when I joined the company. So for me it's time to move on. You may find yourself in a similar position in a couple of years. – Jonathon Cowley-Thom Jan 23 '17 at 11:35
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Yes, but do it tactfully, and here's why.

I've gotten jobs that, according to the job order, I was not qualified for.

Often the job order is written by HR and not the hiring manager, and often things get lost in translation. Years of experience is often thrown out to try to ensure a level of competence, and most care more about the competence than the actual years on the job.

During the interview, ask this question "How hard of a requirement is the years of experience? I have the required skill, but I don't have the years."

Phrasing it that way demonstrates your confidence and skill, while de-emphasizing the time requirement.

With nearly three decades of professional experience, I can say with little fear of contradiction, any company that would turn you down at that point is not a company you want to work for anyway. Remember, an interview is a two way process.

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Sure, mention it, because you don't want to waste their time if they are that concerned with years of experience. I doubt that they really care. Developers are in high demand. They need someone who can write iOS apps. You can do that.

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