3

I'm working as a developer in a small company for almost 10 months now. I got my IT Bachelor's degree, and I'm starting my second bachelor in April. I usually develop websites, apps and html emails. My Boss asked me to keep working here during my study as a part time job, I told him that I'm not able to tell how much time I will have during my study.

Now he wants to put me in a huge Project redesigning and relaunching a huge website for one of our clients, that I have previous working experience with. The last Project I worked on for him took about 5 Months of my work, During which the client and I got used to each other and the work with him was very productive.

The next Project is supposed to start in mid february and will take about 5 to 7 months. My boss promised the client that I will be his developer.

Should I remind my boss that I leave in April again and that I can't do the project? Can I tell my boss that I don't want to work on the project? Or should I not say anything and just start working on the project and let my boss worry about it, when I'm gone?

My Boss is a very cool guy that I can talk to casually. This makes it even harder for me, since we are almost on a friendly basis and I'm worried that my relation with him will suffer and he won't like me as much.

  • 2
    Are you planning to quit all together or are you going to work part time? Or you don't want to work on that particular project for some reason? – ventsyv Jan 24 '17 at 17:12
  • 1
    Easy - Just say no. – WorkerDrone Jan 24 '17 at 20:44
16

You should remind him, so he can minimise the damage. He will like you a lot less if you tell him in April. That's a general rule, if things don't work out, then the earlier people know, the more they can do to reduce the damage.

That is, unless you have a boss who is completely unreasonable - if you thought for example that you would be fired on the spot if you tell him now, then don't tell him. (That's one of the advantages of being a reasonable boss, you get fewer surprises).

  • Thanks for the advice! I talked to my boss this morning about this issue and he told me he was aware that I'll be gone by April. He also is aware that I'll be only working part-time, if any. He planed that I'll be working with this client along with a coworker of mine. That I'd introduce the client to the coworker and in april I'd just support him, to keep the client motivated. He didn't take the conversation wrong. More he was happy for my concern for the company. – Niqql Jan 25 '17 at 8:39
  • "He will like you a lot less if you tell him in April." definitely +1 for this – A. I. Breveleri Jan 25 '17 at 18:10
2

You already told him that you're leaving in April - I am assuming that your boss is not deaf and he heard you the first time. Your boss will have to do without you in April but he apparently has decided that he'll cross that bridge when he gets to it.

That's a perfectly legitimate choice on his part. What's not so legitimate is you telling him that you cannot do the project. Yes, you can do that project until April! And possibly past April, albeit on a reduced hours basis, provided that your second bachelor turns out not to be too demanding and you have some flexibility in your schedule.

Let him worry about how to replace you in April - that's his job not your responsibility.

  • 3
    While that is true, I tend to side with gnasher729 in that it might have just slipped his mind in the moment. A reminder certainly won't hurt. – Llewellyn Jan 24 '17 at 17:57
  • @Llewellyn - gnasher729 are usually on the same page and while our answers are our own, they tend to reinforce each other, that's a good sign for me :) I am not attaching that much importance to a reminder but I have no objection to gnasher729 recommending a reminder as a matter of due diligence. – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 24 '17 at 18:43
  • 1
    @Llewellyn Reminder as the first step sounds reasonable. Vietnhi's answer covers what to do if the boss asks him to do the project anyway. "You told/reminded him, he still insists you take the project. What do you do?" Well, assume that the boss knows what he is doing, and let him deal with what to do when you are gone in April, as against pestering him with "Are you sure? I will be gone in April, how would you handle the project?" – Masked Man Jan 25 '17 at 17:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.