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I just read this question: If you were asked to sing or do other weird things at a job interview, does this mean that the employer is not taking you seriously?

The common consensus seems to be that a request like that is for testing the candidates reaction (to stress or surprise). Let's say that's true. How are you supposed to react and what kind of reaction leaves what kind of impression?

Do you appear like someone that can be pushed around if you accept?
Do you appear to be boring and stiff if you don't accept?

Let's assume you'd do anything to get this job.

marked as duplicate by keshlam, gnat, Thalantas, JasonJ, Chris E Feb 8 '17 at 19:54

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    I believe my response would be "Thank you for your time! Goodbye!" – JohnHC Feb 8 '17 at 14:10
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    @JohnHC Let's assume you need that job to feed your 8 starving children. – Traubenfuchs Feb 8 '17 at 14:14
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    Also possible duplicate of How should I respond to an inappropriate question in a job interview?. – enderland Feb 8 '17 at 14:55
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    something by Rammstein – Retired Codger Feb 8 '17 at 15:21
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    As a semi-pro musician, I'd immediately counter with questions about contracts, rights, rates and residuals, and give them the details of my agent... – PeteCon Feb 8 '17 at 16:33
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I once read a story about an interviewer who asked "what would be your reaction if I asked you to do push-ups?"

Some candidates would immediately begin doing the exercise.

The good ones would look at him and ask "why would you want me to do push-ups?"


The correct response to odd questions is to answer truthfully. If the request is inappropriate for you, then say so. If that means you are not hired, consider yourself lucky.

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    +1 because of the typical audience of this site. In a knowledge worker role "Why do you want that?" is a perfect answer to show critical thinking skills. For something like a laborer or military recruiting where compliance is more important that critical thinking, a compliant answer may be more appropriate. – Myles Feb 8 '17 at 15:11
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I would politely decline. As a matter of fact if I were asked to sing in an interview I may just get up and leave.

If you really want the job, and do not wish to take part, say something like this:

"I must respectfully decline, I am not a singer by trade and do not wish to submit my or your ears to such pain."

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These questions are interesting, because there is hardly any way to answer them without telling something about yourself, personality-wise. Considering the P-scale personality attributes I'd easily see you giving away something about, for instance: Introvert, extrovert? Risk-taking, risk-adverse? open minded, closed? Playful, serious? Personally I'd think it was huge fun and ask what song, but I can imagine other reactions. I think the safest bet is to go for what your first impression is. "No thank you" is a response as well. It would be interesting to know what kind of job was the case. I mean, if someone got the question interviewing for an event manager role, I'd understand it differently than if you were interviewing for back-end-developer.

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If you really want the job why not? It is pretty harmless. Maybe they want to learn more about how you present yourself and how you handle stress. Maybe the job requires you to do errands or other odd stuff and want to know how you react.

If you are a bad singer and would be embarrassed then decline.

You can always decide later to not take the job if it is offered to you.

If you think they are doing it to demean you then decline.

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