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I want to move to a new area for non-work reasons and am looking at jobs there. I have enough saved up that I could afford to pay my own moving expenses, but of course it would be better to get some help and not deplete my savings.

When a job listing does not mention relocation one way or another, should I explicitly mention that I can fund it myself in my cover letter?

I'm asking because I've read some sample cover letters which include a line to that effect - usually the scenario is moving with a spouse who is getting relocated too, so the writer wouldn't need more assistance, but that's not applicable to my situation. I don't want to deter potential employers from considering me at all if they don't offer relocation -- but I also don't want the hiring manager to read it and say "oh great, we won't even offer!" and lose out. Or would it be bad form to mention self-funding in the cover letter, but still ask about assistance if I got an offer?

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    I think you should leave it out – paparazzo Feb 21 '17 at 22:19
  • You should leave it out. Speak to your qualifications and motivation for applying to the role in the cover letter. – jcmack Feb 21 '17 at 22:39
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    I agree there is no reason to mention it. It is a negotiated item during the hiring process and if you get past the initial interview stages the company will likely bring it up before you do. – dlb Feb 21 '17 at 23:03
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    The only time I'd consider bringing it up would be if the advertisement explicitly stated that they can't provide relocation assistance. (Mostly because it makes it clear that you actually did read the advertisement fully and won't reject an offer post interview after discovering the fact.) – Dan Neely Feb 22 '17 at 1:03
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When a job listing does not mention relocation one way or another, should I explicitly mention that I can fund it myself in my cover letter?

No. Don't include it in a cover letter.

Saying that you will pay for your own relocation is unlikely to make you more attractive as a candidate.

Instead, wait until the subject comes up during or just after interviews. You might find that the company will pay part or all of relocation expenses.

Or would it be bad form to mention self-funding in the cover letter, but still ask about assistance if I got an offer?

That would be bad. It would look as if you are confused, or are trying to pull a bait-and-switch.

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    Ask yourself, would I take this job if they didn't offer a relocation. If the answer is yes, don't include something in the cover letter, because if they don't cover it, they won't even consider you. When I did this a few years ago I took my address off the resume as well and just put relocating to Washington DC area. – Bill Leeper Feb 22 '17 at 2:22
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I don't think it's necessary to mention this issue at all. If the company does offer relocation assistance, they won't care - they had planned on paying anyway. If the company doesn't offer relocation assistance, they won't care - all their employees already take care of their own relocation. The fact that you've applied for a job implies a reasonable possibility that you'd accept an offer based on what you saw in the job posting. If they don't mention relocation, and you still applied, that should be enough indication that you're considering the job regardless.

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