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I currently work as a lead developer for my company. I recently applied for a job and got the job offer. However, when they asked for salary in the background check form, I included my bonus which is 10% and 401k benefits and other incentives. So suppose say my actual salary is 100k, I rounded everything to 120k.(with a 20k difference). Will this cause an issue in my background check or will it affect the rate I am being paid at my new company.

Also, I mentioned my title as lead developer and have been for the past couple of years. But my company's HR never bothered changing my title (I had no clue or access to records of what my official title was).

My manager kept mentioning my title was lead and after I bothered checking today with HR, I was told I am registered as a software engineer. Few months ago I recall it saying I was a developer.These guys keep changing titles like its no one business and since it's a big company, switching it to a new title becomes an approval nightmare.

At this point, I wonder if it will cause any major issues while the new company does background check and is it serious enough to make them rescind my job offer. My reference(manager) can confirm with them I am actually a lead and doing my responsibilities as mentioned on my resume and I also have everything else accurate on my resume, be it employment dates or older job titles. I just don't want to lose this new opportunity because I was stupid enough not to check my job title with the HR when I was promoted internally.

Any suggestions or advice? Can they even check salary or job title?

closed as off-topic by Andrew Berry, AndreiROM, Richard U, gnat, JasonJ Mar 6 '17 at 13:39

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    If, like me, you use your real name here, be aware that it's very possible that your future employer will see this question. – Dan Pichelman Feb 28 '17 at 15:38
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    This can vary a lot around the world, but a useful principle to adopt is "My employer considers salary information confidential and I won't divulge it without their consent". Revealing your current salary is a really bad move when negotiating for a new job. – Kaz Feb 28 '17 at 15:44
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    Your first mistake was agreeing to tell them what your previous salary was at all. It's none of their business. At best doing so severely weakens your negotiating position. – Jonathon Cowley-Thom Feb 28 '17 at 15:45
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    If that is your real picture I would advise you to change it, I also would not recommend using your real name. – Mister Positive Feb 28 '17 at 16:01
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    If your old company will disclose your salary that is a problem. Typically they only thing they will disclose is employment dates. – paparazzo Feb 28 '17 at 16:38
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Just to give you an intro.I used to work for a background checking company when I was younger.

First and foremost, if you really are from NY, don't worry about salary. It's never disclosed by HR unless you give the prospective employer your paycheck.

With that out of the way, as far as your job title is concerned, you do not need to worry about that either. Usually, there's very little chance they will check your job title, but rather your employment dates.

However, if they do bother checking your title, it'll be with your HR. The HR department usually has their own codes for the job titles you hold. Say you might be a mobile lead in your department but HR department often has codes to register you as a software engineer or something else of that sort based on departmental codes. Categorizing everyone under 1 single category makes their job easy. However, it is through background reference checks they can verify your title with your Manager. As long as you have given them correct information on employment dates and/or job duties and your references vouch by you, and have no criminal record and/or undisclosed medical issues(for non-profits) you should rest assured you have this job.

Worst case, if they do find some inconsistency, you can always appeal it, usually within 5 days, and they'll follow up with you and if your explanation is reasonable you'll be fine.

But remember, it all depends on these companies, some are very strict with their background checks (example: defense departments, security departments etc), so next time you enter ball park info, make sure you mention it clearly what it includes and what to expect. Transparency and honesty is the best policy.

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    Please format your post so it's not such a wall of text. – nvoigt Feb 28 '17 at 18:33
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    @nvoigt: Right. I took the liberty of editing it. – sleske Feb 28 '17 at 20:10

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