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I am on my second month on my job and don't have a lot of assignments. After a little thinking I decided to tell that to my boss to see if I could be helping in other tasks.

The very moment I asked he replied:

What do you mean? You have a lot of things to do. Didn't you see the sheet x with our pending projects? You have this and this...

The thing is I didn't know about this file with the pending projects (or forgot about it).

After this, he denied some permissions I had requested by his order (we have a system where you submit a request for permission and the manager has to approve) and did not talk much to do after.

So I am silently doing my assignments and didn't say a word after that.

Should I talk to him and explain why I felt I didn't have much to do, try to make it up or just keep doing my job?

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    We had meeting with the pending projects but nothing was assigned to me specifically. We set the priorities on the meeting and the first was on hold so I went to talk to him and say that I had vacant time, what should I do etc. But I started the wrong way and didn't even had a chance to explain my point. – TKT Mar 1 '17 at 21:04
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It is painfully obvious why you did not know tasks were pending.

He got mad the last time you bugged him about this. You think bugging him again is going to help?

Keep your head down and do your tasks.

  • really, this is the only answer. – Richard Says Reinstate Monica Mar 1 '17 at 20:57
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    You are right. Sometimes you only realize how dumb your question is after asking it. But what about the permissions? He specifically asked me to request the permissions and then denied it. Should I talk to him about that? – TKT Mar 1 '17 at 21:08
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    I would just keep my head down for a few days. – paparazzo Mar 1 '17 at 21:30
  • @TKT yes, if he specifically asked you to request something and then denied it, obviously something went wrong. Maybe you asked for the wrong thing? Maybe he accidentally denied it? I would definitely bring it up and ask if you requested the wrong thing. – Thomas Bowen Mar 3 '17 at 15:49
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Don't bring up the conversation about your "vacant time" again - you'd only just dig the hole deeper.

Moving on and doing your job as best you can is the only way to recover from this issue.

Now, it sounds like part of doing your job requires some permissions (I assume access to a system or files on a server). If not having those permissions is preventing you from completing one or more tasks, then simply resubmit again. If your submission process allows it, include the reasons why you need the permissions. I would also send a gentle email reminder to your boss saying something like "Please could you approve the application for permissions I submitted so that I can complete tasks X, Y and Z as scheduled. Thank you".

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