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My company recently completed two huge deals. I was directly involved in the first one, and I had a minor, but essential role in the second one. These deals are quite significant for the company. I am already paid above average, and if the company didn't give me a raise for the next five years I couldn't really complain. However, now I am getting a salary review and I was told that I am getting benefits (pension, private healthcare) instead of a raise. I wouldn't mind, but I also realise that I contributed to one of the biggest deals my company ever did... without getting a single penny of raise or bonus.

I can imagine that my manager wants to spend as little as possible. But give the context, would I be shooting my own foot if I asked for a raise and/or bonus?

closed as off-topic by IDrinkandIKnowThings, Retired Codger, gnat, paparazzo, Chris E Mar 10 '17 at 15:46

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  • It's also a matter of timing: yearly review as the ink got dry on the deal. – ta_notreddit Mar 6 '17 at 1:41
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    I think another question that should be asked is: Is it apart of your job to make these deals, or were you simply right person, place, time? – Hypnic Jerk Mar 6 '17 at 5:49
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    Are you on good enough footing with your manager to ask this sort of thing off-the-record with your manager first? – Teacher KSHuang Mar 6 '17 at 8:19
  • Can you get more money elsewhere should you leave? If so then yeah ask. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Mar 9 '17 at 20:47
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    I am already paid above average, and if the company didn't give me a raise for the next five years I couldn't really complain. Wrong. It's not your job (or in your best interest) to say you're overpaid. Let your company make that decision. Always fight for more pay. Your time is valuable, and you can never get it back. – grfrazee Mar 10 '17 at 14:38
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You are answering the question yourself

 I am already paid above average, and if the company didn't give me a raise for the next five years I couldn't really complain.

I think it won't be fair as the management of the company has to look over a lot of things considering that you are already paid above average with incentives had I been in your company's management I would have rejected your demand for bonus.

And as the comments says it's a matter of timing too. A hit at right time will improve the chances of you getting the bonus with your exceptional performance. But don't be over demanding as it can seem to become a burden on your management and story might take some other turn.

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    -1 What is fair has nothing to do with business. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Mar 9 '17 at 20:39
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    -1: you don't ask, you don't get. Fairness doesn't enter into this at all. If he's made a major contribution asking for more is perfectly reasonable. – kevin cline Mar 10 '17 at 2:28
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    It's about the long run I'm not telling him to never ask for a bonus, but time your action so that both the company and the OP feel equally profited. – Black Mamba Mar 10 '17 at 17:07
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If you approach the situation as if you want to earn not be given, then you are more likely to get it.

I suggest not asking for a bonus, rather ask if you are "bonus-eligible". If you are, ask how to earn the bonus.
If you are not bonus eligible, then ask if you can become bonus-eligible and how.

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I also realise that I contributed to one of the biggest deals my company ever did...

In other words, you did your job.

I worked for a small software company (13 employees) that bankrupted a $120 million dollar subsidiary of Microsoft some years ago in a marketplace war of attrition, a war which saw us become the second largest market player in the world at that time in our domain.

Our payoff? Our salaries. Nothing more, nothing less. Now, if we'd negotiated beforehand some sort of bonus or incentive, that would be a different matter. But as it was, we were getting paid to do our jobs, and we did them. Like you, we were all being paid over the odds anyway (about double market average) and the idea of a bonus was never considered.

I wouldn't ask. It will seem unprofessional and stand you out as an opportunist who didn't have his stuff together to negotiate such things ahead of time.

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    -1 Just because you did not ask for or get a raise or bonus does not mean that no one else should – IDrinkandIKnowThings Mar 9 '17 at 20:40
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    +1 Just because the above reason doesn't warrant a downvote. He is explaining WHY it seems unprofessional. He doesn't say "I didn't ask so you shouldn't". Although questions based on "Is ... Professional" are kind of subjective anyway. – Prodnegel Mar 9 '17 at 23:30

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