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I work as an extern in my company (labour leasing). I have started to work for this company one year ago. At my interview, they have "promised" that they will hire me after one year. One year passed and still, I didn't hear anything from them. I think they will require more time. Meanwhile, I am offered a better job/better paid.

I have started to work for this company after my graduation and I have learnt much from my current company and we have a very good relations and because of this reason, it is not an easy decision to make.

Should I inform my current company about the situation (if you do not employ me, I will have to go) or should I just sign for the other company?

EDIT

To make the question clearer.

There are 3 companies in the game, saying A, B, C. A holds my contract and B hires me from A for a limited time. B promises me to get my contract from A but they did not hold their promises. C is the new player. C offered me a better paid job independent from A and B.

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  • Have you never reminded some higher up of that promise? I would do that as soon as possible, so they get a chance to get things going. Only if you are interested in staying over the other offer of course.
    – skymningen
    Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 14:18
  • I think I do not need to remind them of it because at the beginning, they have signed a one-year contract with the firma, which leases me. That means, after one year, they have talked again and extended my contract one additional year. Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 14:22
  • I think there was a mix up for me, who your "current company" is. Is "my company" in your first sentence different from "my current company" in the last? Anyways, you should have taken action by reminding them about the promise before the year was over. Never think people set themselves reminders for that. The person that "by default" renewed the contract with "your company" might not be the same that had promised you a direct hire.
    – skymningen
    Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 14:24
  • Ok. It is a little bit complicated. There are 3 companies in the game, saying A,B,C. A holds my contract and B hires me from A for a limited time. B promises me to get my contract from A but they did not hold their promises. C is the new player. C offered me a better paid job independent from A and B. Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 14:27
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    @BernhardColby "I think I do not need to remind them of it...", I would not make that assumption. Depending on the size of company B, it is quite possible that the person responsible for the paperwork for extending/renewing a contract is not the same person who "hired" you and promised to convert you to permanent after a year.
    – cdkMoose
    Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 17:44

2 Answers 2

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If you want to leave, by all means do (while, off course, honoring all your contractual obligations in the process).

If you like company C better than A & B, you should switch. It makes no difference whether your current status is "contract", "potential permanent" or "permanent".

If you prefer staying with B: approach your current employer. "Hey boss, I really like working here but contract work is not long term sustainable and my goal is permanent employment. How can we achieve this here?

That's the simple truth. No need to go into previous promises or alternative opportunities at this point. If they stone-wall, than you should leave. If the start acting on it, you have a permanent job at B.

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It's your duty to remind your employer of past promises, even bringing up the subject periodically to verify you're still on track. If left to their own devices, most bosses would rather spare the cost.

You shouldn't wait for them to offer to hire you now, but you should ask. I'm guessing that the other offer has an expiry date, and if you don't accept it you're likely to lose both that and the promotion you've been promised.

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  • However, I think if i remind them of their promise and when they say ok we hire you. It is like I need to stay. I actually want to evaluate the other option. Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 14:33
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    There is no job until the contract is signed. You can't evaluate your options, if they exist, until you have both contracts in hand. You have no obligation (in the same way they have no obligation to hire you).
    – Weckar E.
    Commented Mar 9, 2017 at 14:39

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