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I noticed a factual mistake on my resume towards the final round of my interview. For this position, I sent my resume to a friend of mine to help me proofread. However, I did not expect he changed a line from "Deans list for Year 2 Sem 1" into "2-times Deans list for Year 2 Sem 1 and Year 2 Sem 2"! I have been checking my cover letter and my job descriptions and totally over-looked such a big mistake. It was only today did I chanced upon this mistake. Do note that my GPA is not misstated and I still fit all the hiring requirement of the company. I am asking, would such a mistake constitute misrepresentation? Should I own up to this mistake at the interview, to tell them that I forget to delete it from my resume, or should I not mention anything unless I am asked to do so? Is there an industry best practices for managing such mistakes on resumes?

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    I suspect that this is a detail that didn't factor into the hiring manager's decision at all. The fact that you seem interested in telling them would probably be a plus to me,. – enderland Mar 18 '17 at 0:03
  • Should I give my hiring manager a call to clarify this mistake and send a new resume or should I wait for the day of my final interview and just bring the updated resume to pass them to my interviewers? – desperate Mar 18 '17 at 0:15
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    If you're looking for a script, I would either email your contact an updated copy of your resume and say "I'm so sorry, I just realized I made a mistake on my resume. '2-times Deans list for Year 3 Sem 1 and Year 3 Sem 2' should be 'Deans list for Year 3 Sem 1'" or say that in your next interview and hand out a copy of your resume. Don't blame your friend for updating your resume, just admit you made a mistake. You're not the first new grad to make a mistake and you won't be the last. – Mel Reams Mar 18 '17 at 4:59
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I would email the hiring manager something along the following lines in advance of the interview:

I'm very sorry, I've noticed an error on my CV - x, on page 2, should read y. I have corrected the mistake and attached my updated CV; I sincerely hope this error will not affect your decision.

I think, in all honesty, it's very unlikely that they would have the inclination to check such a fact, especially for a graduate level position. However, if for any reason they had done, this keeps your slate completely clean (as oppose to the potential for it being mentioned at interview before you had a chance to bring it up yourself.)

One additional important point - before you send this email (or make this call), triple check there are no other mistakes on the CV at all! Sending this sort of email once wouldn't affect my decision in the slightest with regards to hiring someone, or suggesting someone was hired. Receiving multiple emails of this nature certainly would, as it then starts to imply sloppiness.

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You need to come clean on this.

Not only is it the right, honest thing to do, but your potential employer may request a copy of your transcripts as part of a background check. At that point it will be harder to say "whoops!".

Just tell the truth, and as this is not a big error IMHO, I think it will turn out fine for you.

Good luck!

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    Should I give my hiring manager a call to clarify this mistake and send a new resume or should I wait for the day of my final interview and just bring the updated resume to pass them to my interviewers? – desperate Mar 18 '17 at 0:15
  • @desperate Yes, I would. No need for this trivial detail to come back an potentially cost you the opportunity. – Mister Positive Mar 18 '17 at 0:18

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