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Initially my current company in my home country got closed and I was given the opportunity to work in another location. I was given a permanent staff contract, 3 years worth of work permit.

Though I seem to get such 'good' offer, the thing is I am not very happy with the current role I am in, still the same role back before the company closes down in my home country. And while during my probation, I talked to my reporting boss (he is my dept. head boss) that I am interested in moving on, he did mentioned something - 'will consider moving me after 1 year or, see how/where to proceed on'.

Of course, no promises are made. Currently I am soon approaching my first annual review in this new location, however my company has the habit of delaying reviews between 2-4 months. And because of that, currently I am living in an apartment that deals with yearly rental leasing and I have yet to inform my landlord if I will be renewing. If I am, that means I will need to sign on for another rental year provided nothing does happens in my current contract, otherwise, I will need to find a place and move my stuff (which costs money) due to me dealing with the review delays.

And so, is it a good idea for me to ask for an early annual review, while using my rental lease as part of the reasoning? Will this gives off as a very bad impression? (Perm. staff or not, there is always the fear that I will be let go as I am an expatriate.)

Any advices?

  • Check your lease, it may have an escape clause for being moved due to work reasons. – HLGEM Mar 24 '17 at 16:56
  • My lease do not have such clause, neither was it exactly stated in my contract too – user3212246 Mar 29 '17 at 22:42
  • a) "the thing is I am not very happy with the current role I am in, the same role as [in my home country]" This sounds like a very long-winded way to say "How do I ask them what I need to do for a promotion?" b) "Boss did [verbally] mention he 'will consider moving me after 1 year'" First, if they won't put something in writing [about promotion], let alone something clear, specific, with timelines, metrics, etc. etc., then they're definitely not promoting you this year, and it's hard to tell if they care much about promoting you next year. – smci Aug 27 '17 at 9:21
  • c) But why does it matter to you? Challenge, type of work, compensation, seniority, stock options? Be honest with us. Could you suggest they give you some more interesting tasks without more compensation? What is actually achievable? d) We know you think you should be promoted, but let's try to figure out how they actually promote people. How long do people stay in your current role? Were other people with your experience level promoted earlier or later? Do they do promotions on ad-hoc basis (usually when people threaten to quit, it's common), or do they actually have any process? – smci Aug 27 '17 at 9:26
  • "is it a good idea for me to ask for an early annual review, while using my rental lease as part of the reasoning?" Separate out those two parts, they're unrelated. Decide whether you want to ask for an early review. Don't mention the lease; it's really not related. In the unlikely event you had to leave early, read about "landlord duty to mitigate damages" and stop worrying. Anyway, don't bring your lease up with the boss, that's irrelevant to the review/ lack of review discussion. – smci Aug 27 '17 at 9:32
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And so, is it a good idea for me to ask for an early annual review, while using my rental lease as part of the reasoning? Will this gives off as a very bad impression? (Perm. staff or not, there is always the fear that I will be let go as I am an expatriate.)

I don't think it's a good idea.

You can ask, but it would be very odd if a company were to move up an annual review for one person because of their housing situation. I'd be surprised if they went along with this request. Imagine if everyone came up with a reason to move their annual review around.

Instead, ask for whatever it is you need in order to make your decision (without bringing your rental lease into the discussion).

If you need a raise, ask for one. If you need a promotion, ask for that. If you need a transfer, ask for that. The company may or may not be willing to give you what you need or may again defer their decision until later.

If you can't get comfortable that you will end up with what you need, then you will simply have to make a decision one way or the other based on the information you actually have.

  • Hey Joe, thanks for getting back, really appreciated it! In that case, when is the best period you (or others) could suggest to me to email? Like 1 month before my annual review? 2 months, 2 weeks etc? In case if you are wondering, it is hard for me to reach my reporting head and hence the email – user3212246 Mar 23 '17 at 0:17
  • I have this concern because I have seen a few cases of empty promises happening even in this new location. Some got moved on, but within a month or two, they got dragged back to their old position due to various reasons - not enough manpower in their old dept, no work etc. or those that got similar 'promises' like me, finally get their chance after 6 months plus! – user3212246 Mar 23 '17 at 0:52
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Feedback and reviews are good when it's given fresh! Having said that, as mentioned by @Joe, It would not be professional of you to ask for early annual review just because of your house rental agreement!

I don't think, He will be giving you any bad surprises during your review. The fact that they have relocated you to another location proves you are a valuable asset to that company. So, just be patient.

Though I seem to get such 'good' offer, the thing is I am not very happy with the current role I am in, still the same role back before the company closes down in my home country.

Talk to him about this during your review. Tell him that you have so much of interest for this company and the people you work with, and you can see yourself beyond your current roles and responsibilities, and you don't wish to be in your comfort zone in this company.

By saying something like above, you are indirectly asking him to consider you for other opportunities as well.

  • Yes I do agree that using housing is not ideal, especially so when I am a perm staff to begin with. Just that right now I am in a dilemma, seeing how 'delayed' reviews can be, which can be pretty vexing for me. Some of my friends are telling me to go on ahead and write the email (not using the housing rental as the reason), but along the lines of what both you and Joe has mentioned, such as 2 weeks to a month earlier before my actual review – user3212246 Mar 23 '17 at 16:19

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