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How am I suppose to ignore this dilemma, if I truly have the company's best interest at heart? I am extremely loyal, objective to a fault. My myers briggs is INTJ, I checked my Enneagram Tritype and it stated "You care deeply and want to help others improve the expectations they have of themselves."...lol

I am in the awkward position of noticing a colleague who is leaving between 15 mins - 30 mins early everyday (depending upon which month in the previous calendar year), and upon occasion takes a 2 hour lunch while the rest of us wait for him before we can take lunch. Once in a while he leaves an hour early.

Firstly, I care about the colleague, I am noticing because I objectively care about the company and the contractual agreement of employment with the company, the fellow colleagues who may be demoralized by this breach and because of the lack of desire to pursue ethics.

Secondly, I acknowledge that we have flexible hours. And it is okay to contravene time requirements if they are an arranged exception, but to blatantly pretend and hope that no one can see you and take a two hour 14 min lunch and leave an hour early on the same day, simply because your supervisor was on training and not in the office? All the other colleagues in our team, they put in extra hours, work from home etc...

I informed my supervisor...not getting anywhere by trying that.

I've been asking him for months, initially last year, tried to point it out gently with euphemisms and analogies... this year, more explicitly.

Can I do anything to get this colleague to work more efficiently?

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    Isn't your responsibility control others time schedule. You already inform your supervisor if he doesn't care why would you? – Juan Carlos Oropeza Mar 27 '17 at 16:22
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    The fact that you're timing his lunch breaks to the minute "2 hour 14 min" already indicates an 'unhealthy' level of interest in something not under your control. If bringing your/his supervisor's attention to his behavior has not helped, perhaps you need to focus more on how his behavior has directly affected you (and others) and bring that fact to the supervisor's attention instead (assuming you haven't done so already). – brhans Mar 27 '17 at 16:47
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    I edited this fairly significantly to make it more on topic and less of a rant. – enderland Mar 27 '17 at 17:08
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    Do your job. Unless your job is to manage this resource, and YOU are accountable for their productivity you need to worry about yourself. Do your job. – Mister Positive Mar 27 '17 at 17:38
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    I had a co-worker overstep his role and try to police my workplace habits. I got him fired for harassment. Be very careful about the level of interest you take in other employees' work habits - "interest" has a funny way of turning into "stalking" on an incident report. My advice (same as always) is keep your eyes on your own fries and let management do their thing. – sleddog Mar 27 '17 at 18:18
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My myers briggs is INTJ,

I am an INTJ. One important realization you will have to learn is to not project your own standards upon everyone you come into contact with or you will have significant interpersonal issues.

I've been asking him for months, initially last year, tried to point it out gently with euphemisms and analogies...this year, more explictly

Unless you have a managerial relationship with this employee, you are greatly overstepping your authority. It is not your job to provide performance feedback to this employee unless it is clearly stated (normally by being a manager).

All the other colleagues in our team, they put in extra hours, work from home etc...

This is irrelevant. What is important is whether or not this employee's manager is happy with their performance. If they are meeting their bosses expectations then their performance and attendance is fine.

I informed my supervisor...not getting anywhere by trying that. Can I do anything to get this colleague to work more efficiently?

In order to get your supervisor to care, you need to do the following:

  • Document how this employee is causing your team to suffer
  • Communicate to your boss when this employee's absence actually affects you

If you can't do this, then the employee's absences aren't actually important enough to matter and you should stop working yourself up around them.

Your boss won't care about you gossiping on this other employee. Well, they probably will, but in a way that reflects more poorly on YOU than them.

Secondly, I acknowledge that we have flexible hours.

Make 100% sure you know this employee doesn't work more before work (or after work) before going on this crusade. If it turns out they work multiple hours in the evening, you are going to look terrible if you continue to push this issue.

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    In other words, if you are not this guy's manager, his hours are none of your business. – HLGEM Mar 27 '17 at 18:45

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