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I've got an interview for a Customer Service Specialist position at BestBuy, and I'm preparing a list of questions to ask. So far I've got:

  • Do I need to clarify anything I put on my resume or said today?
  • Based on what you’ve gathered about me, what should I improve on to better fit this role?
  • If I got the position, would I receive any form of training, or would I just jump in?
  • Is there anything else you think I should know about this position?

Should I take out any questions? Any suggestions on other questions to ask? Should I rephrase any of these? I'm really nervous, I have the interview later today.

  • TBQFH, they will probably answer all these in their spiel, but take them anyway and tick them off as they get brought up. Anything you want to clarify during the interview, make a note and ask at the end. – JohnHC Mar 30 '17 at 14:37
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Do you not care what the job pays? What the hours are? What you should wear to work? If people typically work in only one department or move around as needs arise? How you know the answers to customer's questions and what backup you have if you don't know?

Three of your four questions are "am I likely to get this job?" or other non-questions. Stop and think about being a Customer Service Specialist at BestBuy. Do you know how these people spend their workday? Do you know why (other than the paycheque) you want to join them? Is there really nothing you have wondered about the position that isn't clarified in the job posting? Nothing? Then how can you possibly want this job, as opposed to "any old job that will take me"? Stop fussing about whether you're doing well in the interview and start thinking about using the interview to learn about the actual job you are offering to take.

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I'd drop the first two questions. Training is always good to ask about. Also ask about the management structure (who you report to), and what a typical day looks like. Remember that you're interviewing them, as well as they interviewing you.

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Do I need to clarify anything I put on my resume or said today?

This will come up during the interview itself.

Based on what you’ve gathered about me, what should I improve on to better fit this role?

I would not ask this question myself in this way. You could rephrase it to something like "How do you think I could make a better fit?"

If I got the position, would I receive any form of training, or would I just jump in?

I would rephrase this to: "If I got the position, what kind of training would I get?"

Aside from that, I've always asked the person interviewing me why they chose the company, and how they like working there now. They'll most likely be intrigued by those questions and are happy to answer them (honestly as well).

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As I look at your list of question, the questions are mostly good and valid, but all seem to be focused on you.

Try to come up with some questions about the environment, the culture, the interviewers that don't just relate to you or you doing better. I'd avoid anything that is definitive immediate feedback/advice, because that's kind of like asking them for a decision, right away.

"Based on what you’ve gathered about me, what should I improve on to better fit this role?" - would be excluded, if it was, well, me. You're asking them to focus on where you fall short. They'll look that over, and evaluate it, but you don't need to make that more prominent in their minds.

Asking about training is good and appropriate. Clarification is polite and helpful, yes. Anything else they feel you should know? Also good.

Perhaps "what do you like the most about working here?" Or "how long have you been with the company, and did you have other positions here before your current one?"

or maybe a question about what the future potential would be for someone hired for this position who excelled at their job.

Those are generally positive questions, and they communicate an interest in the company, the people there, and the work environment, beyond just getting a job and getting paid.

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I would keep the 1st question, and rephrase the 3rd (just remove the jump in part). I would also ask about how your performance will be assessed, and if there is any possibility for advancements in the future. You could also mention that you like to receive feedback on your performance in order to improve it, and therefore if any will be provided by your manager, and in case how often.

Do not feel nervous about the interview; if you have ever had any previous interview for a customer service position, this one will probably look very similar. In my experience of more than 25-30 interviews in this field, they always make the same questions.

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